David Bailey - Black Frames

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by lewismalpas, Oct 26, 2014.

  1. lewismalpas

    lewismalpas TPF Noob!

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    Hey,

    Just been looking at David Bailey's photographs and have always wondered how he adds the black border to his scans, can anyone explain how this effect is achieved? Does he simply scan the negatives on a flatbed?

    http://writtenonskin.nl/wp-content/uploads/man-ray-1968-photo-david-bailey.jpg

    Many thanks,
    Lewis.


     
  2. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It just looks like a bad cropping job with an awkward/crooked border. I'm assuming it's probably done in PS or something, but that's just an assumption.

    Jake
     
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  3. photoguy99

    photoguy99 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Those are probably wet prints made with a filed-out negative holder.

    It's an affectation to show that the entire negative is being printed, no cropping. This is supposed to indicate that the photographer got it right in camera and is therefore awesome.

    If they're not wet prints on a filed-out holder, then it's a fake designed to look like that.

    It was de riguer for a while.
     
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  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Yup, right on all counts. It was an affectation, and it became pretty widely held by "some" who considered it a valuable way to prove their mettle with a camera. Kind of like high-wire work without a net, or rock-climbing without safety gear, or driving without a seat belt.
     
  5. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    As above, here's one of mine from tonight next time i'll get it black right round

    [​IMG]
     
  6. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Here you go again talking BS you got it totaly wrong
     
  7. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Totally*
     
  8. dennybeall

    dennybeall No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You know it does look like "a bad cropping job with an awkward/crooked border" and could easily be achieved with Photoshop.
    From what Derrel says that may not be correct but it's a valid statement. Not sure why someone would make a personal attack about that.
     
  9. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    To each his own, I guess. I understand now that it was a form of flexing your photography muscles, but still stand that it seems rather distracting and looks like a haphazard border.

    Jake
     
  10. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    That would be my call. Having shot professionally in the film-only days ... that's how I used to print. The negative carriers did not have very close tolerances which often caused a negative to 'slip' a bit, rendering the borders less than perfect.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Gary
     
  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I used to print the same way, knockout borders,NO cropping, on a Leitz Focomat on Kodak fiber-based papper. I was taught that was "the way to do it". It took a long time to realize that it was merely an affectation. A schtick. But hey, it was a different era back then. We lived in fear of "the bomb" and "the Russians". We thought Reagan would get us in a war in South America. The US government funnel war materials and supplies into Afghanistan. We TRAINED Osama Bin Laden and his Taliban followers, so they could fight our proxy war in Afghanistan, against the Russians!! We talked about "the wall", and East and West Germany. Hell, Pink Floyd had an album named The Wall that was the biggest selling album of the year. Knockout borders didn't last too much longer as "the way".

    In a society filled with fakery and lies and deceit, the knockout border conveyed authenticity; it showed "the whole negative"; it showed that it had been done "right", in the camera. In an era filled with network TV fakery,bogus TV advertising slogans, and sanitized network news doled out in 1/2 hour increments by only three national networks, the knock-out borders showed us the real truth, and assured viewers that what they saw was "real".

    Things changed. By the time the Berlin wall fell, the knockout border had died off. Video, and MTV and VH-1 had come to dominate pop visual culture, and B&W concepts of the 1960's were pretty much dead by the late 1980's.
     
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  12. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    That's an interesting take. We, my peers and I back in the film-only days, were never taught to print outside the borders. We were just told that some did so. In the digital world, after growing up a bit. I realized that the borders not only proclaimed the skill of the photog but also an arrogance. Over time I've been removing my Henri Cartier-Bresson borders from my images.

    Striving to capture images that are only cropped in the camera, significantly improved my photography. If a shot needed any kind of post-capture cropping, even fixing/un-tilting the horizon ... it was dumped. I am far from my photographic prime ... but I am striving to get back to full-frame, no post-cropping captures. But this time around, the only person who needs to know ... is me.

    Gary

    PS- I strongly suggest to advanced photogs to shoot FF/no post-cropping. Jumping into this type of shooting really forces you to sharpen your composition eye and increases your attention to detail.
    G
     
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