Filters : how to choose the right one?!

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by Minissa, Mar 7, 2009.

  1. Minissa

    Minissa TPF Noob!

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    Hello everyone,

    I am learning a lot about photography these days and I still don't get it with filters.

    Here's my question for you guys :

    How do I choose the right filter, polarizer (for exemple screw-in filters) for my lenses (Nikon 18-200mm and Nikkor 50mm f/1.8D) ????

    I don't want to buy a lot of filters, so I think screw-in filters will be fine for me.

    If you have any tips and good web sites to buy them, feel free to give them to me! :)

    Thanks a lot! :hug::
     
  2. IanK

    IanK TPF Noob!

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    Filters can easily be picked up from places like ritz, B&H, Ebay Ext. just make sure you get the right size for the filter threads on the lens and you'll be good, ex. 50 1.8 is a 52 MM filter thread size.
     
  3. Minissa

    Minissa TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Iank!

    :hug::
     
  4. itznfb

    itznfb TPF Noob!

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    i also have tough time choosing filters. i currently just use quantaray filters, i ordered some tiffen and hoya filters but from what i've read from some people here the filters i have and the one's i've purchased are so so, and won't really do my photos much good.

    i'm a pretty basic beginner photographer. i'm into photography more for the technical enjoyment not the artistic. so i like learning about the process, the equipment and how to achieve a good technical result.

    that being said, i use basic filters mainly for protection and glare. the same would probably go for any beginner whether they are artistic or technical.

    what i would like to know is what kind of filters the experienced users here put on their lenses.
     
  5. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Filter brands are just brands. Hoya is not a bad brand they just happen to make some a few bad filters.

    Basically the quality of the filter is dependant on the quality of the glass and the antiglare coatings they have applied to them. I won't use anything lower than a Hoya SHMC series filter because I have found the lower grades affect the image quality: http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/...100830-more-hoya-filter-comparison-tests.html, but on the same token I won't buy a Hoya Pro1D since I found there to be no positive difference that is anywhere near worth the extra cost.
     
  6. itznfb

    itznfb TPF Noob!

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    i also have a 50mm 1.8, could you recommend a good UV, warming, and polarizing filter for the 52mm screw in type?

    i've found it very difficult to determine which is a good/bad filter while shopping online. each brand has 100's of filters for each type
     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I'd suggest stick with what gives you by far the best bang for buck. Typically this will be the Hoya / Kenko HMC or SHMC series, available from ebay.

    Check your 50mm f/1.8 somewhere there should be the greek symbol thi and a number which determines the thread dimensions on the front of the lens. This is typically 52mm I think on most 50mm f/1.8s.

    Then go shopping. Btw ignore the warming filter. It's a relic from the film days. The warming filter can me applied in photoshop with 3 clicks and even gives you a choice of the exact warming filter colour to apply.
     

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