Graduated Neutral Density filter

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by mattvillano, Dec 15, 2004.

  1. mattvillano

    mattvillano TPF Noob!

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    Does anyone know anything about this filter and whether it is quality?
    http://www.adorama.com/LEPND6G.html

    I've been looking to buy a Grad ND filter and I don't want to spend a fortune but I don't want to get a cheap one like the Cokin's which alter colors. If not this one can anyone recommend good ones or places to find them. Thanks.
     
  2. walter23

    walter23 TPF Noob!

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    Are cokins really considered cheap? I've only heard good things about them, but maybe that's only because of the convenience of using their drop-in system?
     
  3. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    They are fine for amateur use but never use a grad with a zoom. As you extend the focal length the grad line becomes quite a sharp edge and looks really false. Grads are all designed to work with a standard lens.
     
  4. mattvillano

    mattvillano TPF Noob!

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    All the articles and tipes I've been reading have said to stay away from the Cokin grad ND filters because they aren't actually a neutral tone, just grey. So they tend to create unwanted color casts in color film.
     
  5. Jamie R

    Jamie R TPF Noob!

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    Sad to hear Cokin's whole line of Z-Pro and X-Pro filters all get the same bashing that the A(mateur) and P systems deserve.

    The A+ P systems use a cheap dye resin which is just awful; but it isn't a problem if you're shooting black and white photography on the cheap (wot' at $5 a piece or less?!).

    The Z-Pro and X-Pro system use a higher grade of resin which is neutral density proper, instead of just grey-dyed. The prices reflect the higher grade, and these are still cheaper than Lee filters. They scratch badly and often though. The drop in system is useful - even for wide-angle lenses.
     

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