I want to buy my first camera

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by benner410, Nov 28, 2008.

  1. benner410

    benner410 TPF Noob!

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    So I really want to get into high-res photography. I don't want to buy the best and most advanced camera on the market right now, but I want something that will take amazing close-up shots (small things in great detail) and beautiful outdoor landscape shots. Something that I can also take on trips and take pictures of the family and such.

    What is a good camera for me to be looking at? It has to be digital (I like editing on my computer), and not be overly expensive. Being able to buy it at Best Buy or some other local store is a plus too. If not, that's ok.

    Thanks!
     
  2. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    What does not overly expensive mean? That could be $1000 for me but $500 for you.

    You are talking about doing it all with the lenses, from a short focal lenght for a wider / landscape shot, mid-ish range zoom for some portraits and family shots, a macro lens for the close ups.

    So it depends on budget. I would just say get the best you can afford that would come with a kit lens in the 18-55mm range. The only thing you would be missing is the macro lens.
     
  3. benner410

    benner410 TPF Noob!

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    I'm seriously looking at the Nikon D40 right now due to it's price + reputation.
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I almost always recommend a DSLR camera over smaller digital cameras...but since you mention 'amazing close ups'...I will point out that many 'point & shoot' style digital cameras can get very close and actually get decent macro shots.

    To do something like that with an SLR type camera, you would like need either a special 'macro' lens or extension tubes etc.
     
  5. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    My old Kodak 3.2mp DC290 can capture amazing close-up shots and beautiful outdoor landscape shots. It is just the medium to capture what I envision. What I am trying to say here is that amazing shots come from people not cameras. There is no magic camera that will take amazing shots.

    First you need to decide how much effort you want to put into this. A P&S is more automated and less complicated for most people to use. My father -in-law takes some beautiful landscape stuff with his. If you are willing to spend more time to learn than a DSLR is the way to go. It has more options and allows you to do some things that the best point and shoot will not.

    Next you need to decide on your budget. This is the real stickler in photography. It gets expensive. Photography is a very serious pastime for me. It relieves the stress of the day to day world I work in. I probably have around $15,000 to $20,000 invested in this pastime. Is it worth it? To me it is. You have to decide how much you are willing to spend to get started. There will always be things to add on to make shooting easier or better. Once you know where you want to go in terms of equipment and expense we will be in a better position to advise you.
     
  6. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

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    I would go for the D70S. Only slightly more expensive, but you get way more in terms of features, and the lens that comes with it is way better. The D40 has major flaws, such as durability, shutter life, and lack of AF motor. The D70s has twice the shutter life, is much more stocky and durable, and does have a built in AF motor. It also has more focus points.

    To do close ups, you're going to need a macro lens. A decent macro lens can run $500, and the Nikkor macro lenses much more. I would look at the Tokina 100mm F2.8. From what I've read, its quality is on par with the Nikkor, at a fraction of the cost.
     
  7. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    Actually, you might have more fun with the D90 considering your mentioned use for family photos and its video capability to add something different.

    skieur
     
  8. anubis404

    anubis404 TPF Noob!

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    Agreed. Its hard to say though, because I don't know what his budget is.
     

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