Infrared film and the Canon Rebel 2000, compatible?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by GerryDavid, Mar 20, 2004.

  1. GerryDavid

    GerryDavid No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    According to the manual of this camera, the camera cannot take the infrared film, but im wondering isnt 35mm film just 35mm film? Or is there something about the focal length that messes this up? I think I heard that infrared has a different focal length than reg 35mm film.

    And on a related note, is infrared film sililar to the b&w process or color process? Would I have to send it away to be done or could I develop it the way Id develop b&w film and do it myself? Due to the cost of getting true b&w developed, id wnat to do it myself, which is why im asking. I dont have the portable darkroom or chemicals yet.

    I like the effect that infrared has on tree's and grass and can give some nice artistic results.
     
  2. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    The modern Canons use an infrared LED to track the film sprocket holes for determinng exposure count and position. You can use IR film, but the bottom will often be fogged by the LED.
     
  3. havoc

    havoc Jedi something or other

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    I have often used IR film in my Elan 7 which uses the same IR film reading laser. I also have never had a problem with fogging on the film. If i looked real close there is a portion on the bottom of the film that may be fogged, but its less then 1mm in height from the bottom. This is usually cropped out in the darkroom so it never bothered me. I think canon puts that disclaimer in there because they don't wanna be lible for any ruined IR film. Try one roll and see if you have a problem with it.

    Oh and yes IR film can be devoloped just like T-max Tri-x and other pro B&W films. D76 works well as does Tmax dev. I am assuming your using Kodak HIE? Nice fast film, alittle grainy but its nice. There are other IR films out there but those i haven't tried.
     
  4. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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  5. GerryDavid

    GerryDavid No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    So far ive been using Ilford 125 and 400 B&W film, developing them with generic D76 I think it is at the colleges dark room. I wonder if Blacks Photography has infrared, im a bit surprised they have b&w stuff. The boxes I got last were covered in dust. How much does a roll generally cost? The Ilford 125 was $6 Canadian.

    Thanks for the advice.
     
  6. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Gerry, I agree with what the others have said. With the Kodak HIE, if there's a shot you reeeeeally want to have turn out, just give yourself a step back while composing to guard against any potential fogging. And you may find you won't needed to have taken that step, but it's something to try.

    If you DO experience an unacceptable amount of fogging, you can get very similar IR results with Ilford 200 SFX film. It's a fun little film, slap on orange or #25 red filters and see what happens.

    My husband develops my HIE and his biggest complaint is the thinness of the film which makes it more prone to crimping while winding. So beware.
     
  7. GerryDavid

    GerryDavid No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Do you mean to step back so that the image im wanting in the film will be smaller so theres more room to crop so if the bottom does fog, I can crop it out?
     
  8. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Yep. Take the shot that way you want to take it....then (at least until you know whether or not you'll have fogging) step back and take it again.

    Crude, but effective. :wink:
     
  9. GerryDavid

    GerryDavid No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks for the advice. :0)
     

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