Is there an advantage to shooting B&W from your camera instead of PP

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jg123, May 31, 2008.

  1. jg123

    jg123 TPF Noob!

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    Here is a picture that I really like the B&W version of but I am wondering if I would have gotten a better quality pic if I used the B&W setting on the camera (Canon XSI) when I first took it? I just changed it over to B&W in Picasa

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    None really. You have more control in programs.
     
  3. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

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    Theres not really a benefit, but there is a downside to doing that; you cant go back to color if you want to.
     
  4. Muffinabus

    Muffinabus TPF Noob!

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    Don't mean to hijack the thread or anything, but how about B&W film? Would there be much of a difference if you used B&W film over using color and Photoshop?
     
  5. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Muffinabus... the question is basically film vs. digital. That is a nightmare of a thread to start.

    IMO, on print... B&W from negative done on traditional wet darkroom looks better than digital processed.
     
  6. elemental

    elemental TPF Noob!

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    You are definitely putting yourself at a disadvantage shooting digital black and whites in your camera. Though as far as I know Picasa has pretty basic conversion options (is it just a button like iPhoto?), more feature-rich programs like Photoshop or GIMP give you very
    powerful control over the process, allowing you to much more carefully tweak the black and white conversion to exactly how you want it.
     
  7. KD5NRH

    KD5NRH TPF Noob!

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    There's no listing of times for SD cards on the TMax dev bottle...does it vary by capacity?
    :greenpbl:
     
  8. Senor Hound

    Senor Hound TPF Noob!

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    The advantages to shooting in B&W on card is that you have a better idea of what it will look like already, and it takes up less space (if shooting in JPEG, not RAW).

    The disadvantages were listed, and basically it is that if you ever want color in it, you're out of luck. Also, you can turn your photo into a black and white different ways, and each way makes it look slightly different. If you shoot B&W from the camera, you are not afforded this option.


    I still shoot in B&W in camera. I probably shouldn't, but forget what people say. They are all correct in their statement that you should really shoot in color, but sometimes I just don't want to, and since my photography is all about me having a good time, I do it anyway. When the photo is yours, there's no wrong way to take it (just some are more interesting than others).

    That's because it uses Compact Flash... :) BTW, this got me thinking. If you really wanted to confuse people, you could store your excess memory SD cards in a film canister. People would look at you funny when you have 4 rolls of film in the case of your DSLR (and no film camera in sight)!
     
  9. K_Pugh

    K_Pugh No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    One option you might want to consider is getting one of those eye-pieces that some people use when shooting in B&W.. it has nothing to do with the camera just a viewing aid to help you see the scene in B&W tones etc. I think it's just an olive green filter that you hold to your eye, can't remember the exact name for them. I think this might help you see in B&W and still shoot in colour - would make life easier than shooting in B&W to see if it works, then retaking in colour.

    But if you like shooting in B&W that's entirely cool! you do what you like to do, have fun, and when you're out looking to shoot in B&W you see things slightly differently again, so it's all good.
     
  10. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    there is a wratten 90 filter which is used quite often to help people learn how to translate color to a monochrome scene.

    it does not convert to black and white, nor to green, but has an orange cast, but it does drop out the color so one can think in terms of light and shadow,

    leaning to "see" in black and white is critical . for example; red , green and blue are very similar in grey tone with black and white film (or converted digital). when using film, we use filters to separate values so these tones aren't so close in value.
     
  11. KD5NRH

    KD5NRH TPF Noob!

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    I might do that once I get a DSLR...the Maxxum 8000i just needs one of these with a SideSaddle sized for 35mm canisters and a 1907 sling. Throw on a 500+mm lens and I should be stylin' big time right up until the cops tackle me.

    In the meantime, if I was going to do something with the subject of the OP's photo, I'd move her over to a less busy background, tighten up the DOF and the zoom, and use Tri-X pushed a couple of stops. The dark sunglasses and clothes with light skin and in-between hair look like a good combination for the contrast I get from that film. Probably bounce some light onto her face from below/right, too, since the push might overdo the shadows and highlights there.

    (Now if I could just plan out shots that thoroughly when I'm behind the camera, I'd be set.)
     
  12. Chewbecca

    Chewbecca TPF Noob!

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    I have yet to shoot in B&W. I am still new, but I always B&W in PP.
    And I usually B&W if all else fails in color. Like, if I have taken pictures that I really love, but I cannot get the color right in them in PP, I'll B&W them.
    I had to do that with some shots of my son. They were too adorable to scrap, so I had to do what I could to save them.
    :lmao:
     

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