Just bought slides

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by &Denekamp, Jul 27, 2005.

  1. &Denekamp

    &Denekamp TPF Noob!

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    but now I'm having second thoughts.. :confused: and I'd like to get some advice.

    The problem is, I'm going on a holiday in a few days. To a location where I've been before a couple of times, so I already have some shots planned out. So it wont be all holiday snapshot (I will be shooting those with another camera) I bought the slides for my more serious photo's because I wanted them to have vivid, full colour. But, I have never shot slides before and I just figured that your expose has to be just right to get good results. So I'm all of a sudden not so sure about it.. I mean, I won't be going to that location any time soon to do a reshoot, so I'd like my photos to come out good this time.

    If I look at the histograms of my scanned negatives, the exposure is quite good most of the time (some meter reading mistakes every once in a while, but nothing to seriously off) But I don't know if these are corrected by the lab, or if they can only correct the prints and not the negatives.

    So, would it be wise to trade in the slide film for negative film? or will I do fine shooting slides? I'd really like to try out slides, but I don't know if it would be wise to try it on a vacation. I'm still quite positive (haha, slides are also positive..:meh:) about it myself, but my father is giving me second thoughts by saying he does not understand why I bought slides..

    Thanks in advance for your help!

    (oh, I bought Fuji Sensia)

    Niels
     
  2. ThatCameraThingy

    ThatCameraThingy TPF Noob!

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    Shoot the slide, there is nothing that beats a well exposed slide !!!

    Yes the exposure needs to be good, but in general I find that I can trust my camera's meter. When in doubt , bracket. IT's really well worth the trouble .

    I still remember my first slide. Got it back from the lab and was blown away when we put it on the light box.

    Bite the bullet and go for it !!!

    Hanno
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you are unsure, bracket your shots. Maybe try Fuji Velvia...it's the super saturated slide film that everybody raves about for landscape shots.
     
  4. RikWriter

    RikWriter I see a need for sarcasm!

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    Question from someone who knows little about 35mm SLRs...what do you DO with slides besides project them on a screen? I mean, is there some way to have prints made from slides if you so desire? Or to blow those prints up if you want one framed?
     
  5. &Denekamp

    &Denekamp TPF Noob!

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    Thats true (I think)

    But, then it needs to be well exposed to begin with :p

    I'll try, I'll try :)

    just one question. what;s 'bracket'..?

    Thanks for your help,

    Niels
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Bracketing is taking multiple exposures of the same scene, with different exposure values. The idea is to cover all your bases in case the meter is wrong..or just not what you want.

    Take a shot at the meter reading. Then increase the exposure (the amount can vary, maybe only 1/3 stop is needed...maybe 1 1/2 stops) and take another shot. Then take a shot with less exposure than the meter reading. The chances of getting that great exposure are much better. This is especially helpful when using slide film because the exposure latitude is so narrow.

    I'm not much of a slide guy (especially since going digital) but there are good reasons that people use them. They can reproduce great colors, and the images are clear which can make for great look enlargements. A lot of pros use slides for this reason I believe. On plus, is that what you shoot is what you get. With color negative film, the lab has a lot to do with how the print looks.

    Yes, you can have prints made from slides. It can be expensive though. Typically, you just get the slides back and look them over with a light table or slide viewer and a loupe. Then you can choose which images you want to have printed or enlarged.
     
  7. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    I wouldn't worry so much about the exposure issues with the slides. Really it's a plus if you ask me. You need to expose correctly like with anything else but the nice thing is that you can actually see the difference between two photos that are 1/3 of a stop apart. Keep in mind that "correct" exposure is a matter of opinion and look at it from the viewpoint that with the slides you get exactly the exposure you want. It's not like there is only one correct exposure and if you're a little off it will look crappy, and being able to see the difference in slight changes in exposure helps you learn about this.

    Dave
     
  8. Dave_D

    Dave_D TPF Noob!

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    Slide film can't be beat for scenic and landscapes.

    Don't get me wrong. Digital has come a long way and does do itself some justice.

    For vivid colors your best bet is fuji velvia 50/100/100F. The sensia that you have will be good for fine grain quality, but is a "natural color" film. Always take several pictures of a scene that means alot. adjust your exposure the way others here have explained so well and you will be in good shape. As for prints. depending on the lab you use will determine if they can make prints from slides for you or if it will have to be sent out. In any case, image quality of a shot with the right silde film can't be beat. Just remeber this: Kodak favors reds and oranges which is good for sunsets etc. Fuji favors blues and greens which is good for colorful landscapes and you'll be OK.
    Good Luck...
     
  9. &Denekamp

    &Denekamp TPF Noob!

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    Thanks a lot, all of you! :) This has been a great help already :D

    But, I had a sleepless night last night, so quess what? I came up with some new questions.. sorry :meh:

    First one that came to my mind when reading your posts was 'What is 1/3 or 1/2 of a stop?' Is that say, inbetween 1/1000 and 1/500? is that even possible? I never did/tried it before..

    I hear you all talking about Velvia 50/100. I asked for that at the photoshop, but he hadn't got that in store.. The next best thing (he said) he had for me was the Sensia film. But what he gave me was Sensia 200 asa (is that's the same in ISO mesures?) So, If I shouldn't trade it in for normal film, should I try and trade it in for Sensia 100 film?

    And one more question.. Is slide film good for panorama's? I'm planning on doing a couple of panorama's (both horizontal and vertical) I would give great colour to the panno, but I'm not sure if that narrow exposure latitude is gonna cause problems..

    Oh man, this is gonna be such a learning experience :D I can't wait

    I hope I don't fall in love with slides to much though, b/c they are frickin expensive..:confused:

    Again, Thanks for all the great help!

    Niels
     
  10. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    Neils,

    You are on the right track as far as the stops are concerned. The difference between 1/1000th and 1/500th shutter speed is actually a full stop, as is the difference in aperature between f5.6 and f4. Some lenses have half-stops between markings so that you can make a half-stop difference in exposure. Sometimes cameras that have automatic exposure will allow changes of 1/3 of a stop. 1/3 of a stop is the same difference in exposure as you would need to make to get the same shot from a 100 film and a 125 film. It's a pretty small difference, I mentioned it to make a point as 90% of the time I'm using my 70's camera that allows changes of 1/2 stop or more.

    Yes ISO and ASA are basically the same thing, ASA used to be the way some film was rated until a universal international system was used (ISO).

    If you're really concerned about the film I would keep the film you have (to use in a less critical situation) and try going for some pro film, sensia is fuji's consumer line. I have to say that for all the talk about Velvia, I think I wouldn't be the only one to say that the colors are saturated considerably beyond reality to the point where it's really not that good for portraiture because skin tones are so far off. It gives a certain look that can be attractive, but in my opinion is the equivalent of adding sugar to everything and then remarking about how sweet everything tastes. Of course many people swear by it, I'm just saying it's not unanimous. The other fuji's (Provia and Astia) are supposed to be more balanced I believe as are Kodak films which I happen to prefer. I've had good results with Kodachrome, Ektachrome and the E100 films.

    Slide film is usually a dollar or two more to buy and a dollar or two less to process (excepting Kodachrome) so it works out in the end.

    Dave
     
  11. &Denekamp

    &Denekamp TPF Noob!

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    Thanks Dave!

    My camera is a Pentax MX so thats about the same age as your 70's camera. So I could just set the exposure dail between 1/1000 and 1/500 and it would be half a stop more that 1/500 (or half a stop less that 1/1000 depending on how you look at it)?

    Could I also use the aperture ring on the lens? setting it inbetween say 8 and 11.

    When I go out to buy film again I will ask for those other films you recommended. The man at the photoshop said he ocasionaly used the Sensia he gave me proffesionally. Don't know how much is true about that, but it helped him selling the film to me I guess :p

    Thanks for your help! I'm not so unsure about the film anymore, I'm more exited now. looking forward to all the pictures I'm gonna take :D

    Niels
     
  12. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    I'm sure Sensia isn't bad and you'd probably be happy with the results. You just might do better with a pro film if you are particularly concerned about a certain subject.

    MX eh? I use a K2. Each of the adjustments on the shutter speed dial is going to be one stop (aka double or half the light). I doubt you can get speeds between those stops (ie. 1/750th), especially with a mechanical camera it's only one or the other. All of the numbered stops on your aperature ring are also one stop (2.8,4,5.6,8,11, etc.) The stops between the numbered ones are 1/2 stops (as you say between 8 and 11 is 1/2 stop away from 8 and 11). Unlike shutter speeds you can set the aperature dial between stops, but I find it rarely necessary and depending on the lens it can be difficult to get it to stay. You might look up some sites on exposure or find a book on it, there are some good ones out there.

    One other thing about slide film is that it responds (looks) better to underexposure than overexposure. When shooting something like a sunset a 1/2-stop underexposure will give nice rich colours. Of course it's all subjective and the majority of the time I certainly expose for neutral grey (and there are plenty of people here with far more expertise than I to give better advice).

    Dave
     

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