Lighting problems

Discussion in 'The Professional Gallery' started by Admirer, Sep 25, 2006.

  1. Admirer

    Admirer TPF Noob!

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    Hi all i am having problems with my lighting i think the pictures are coming out too flat. I am using 2 flash heads with brollies.
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  2. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

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    They're not the flatest I've seen. Do you have a flash meter? If so meter the heads seperately and try for about a stop's difference. You can also adjust the angle of the lights, if they're both very front on it will not give you a decent differential.

    As another option, grab a big sheet of polystyrene and use it as a reflector with just one light, will set you back only a few quid. Paint one side of it black and you have a big subtractor too.
     
  3. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    The light seems to be slightly head on and kind of all over the place. Try the main high and at a 45ยบ angle to the model. A bounce card as opposed to a second flash may give the depth you are looking for. Tell us the exact position of the strobes and we can help further. I am not sure what "brollies" are. I am guessing diffusion of some sort.
     
  4. kugy5

    kugy5 TPF Noob!

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    By using 1 light and a descent reflector you have freed your second light which you may want to use as a hair light which would also help make things less flatt looking, If Imay suggest not taking portraits of people with roundish faces from underneath as it makes them look heavier but moove your vantage point higher and slightly to the side.
     
  5. Admirer

    Admirer TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the advice all. I had 1 flash towards the model close to the camara through a diffuser the other light i had was aprox 70-80 degrees to the left of how the model was facing but reflected rather than directed. I was limited as it was for my sister and she wanted the pictures in the corner of the room.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm no expert on studio lighting...but maybe your fill (light close to camera) was too closely matched to your key light. If you took the fill light down a stop or so...that would bring up the ratio of light to shadow on the faces...giving them more dimension.
     
  7. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Hmmm... looks to me like the ratio is close, just reversed. What I mean is the fill light is causing the modeling (shaping). See how the shadows are going down? It sorta works in the last one. This is called "butterfly lighting" due to the butterfly shaped shadow under the nose. This works well on good looking people, like models with sculpted cheek bone definition and classic good looks.

    Pete
     

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