Metering.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by rangerrick9211, May 19, 2009.

  1. rangerrick9211

    rangerrick9211 TPF Noob!

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    What in camera meter do you use most often? What are the factors that influence which you choose? Thanks for your help!
     
  2. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Spot and center weighted. The in-camera meter is easily confounded in other modes, particularly if there is little light variation is a scene like a black dog sitting on a pile of coal or a white dog out in the snow.

    I meter the highlights and the shadows and from experience pretty much know what settings I want to used based on that. 98% of the time I use Av and M modes.

    I capture in the RAW file format and introduce an 18% grey card (I have a small one on my keychain) into my shots when the light changes for setting white balance later in ACR.
     
  3. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Spot metering.

    20 years figuring out how to take a picture I like.
     
  4. dcclark

    dcclark TPF Noob!

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    Matrix metering, with judicious use of exposure compensation, and a lot of experience learning how the meter reacts to different types of scenes. I'm at the point where a single button press and flick lets me get the meter right where I want it, without having to twiddle with the position of the center-weighted or spot meter.

    I do use the spot meter in extremely wonky lighting situations, such as very high dynamic-range areas, or something where I want to expose for only a specific part of the frame.
     

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