Midnight Church

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by Andraste, Feb 17, 2007.

  1. Andraste

    Andraste TPF Noob!

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    Hey all,

    This is an old photo that I really never did anything with till recently. I forgot I had it lol. I messed around with it a little and came up with this, let me know what you think ^^ Picture of a Church in Downtown Morris, IL.


    [​IMG]


    Thanks for lookin' ^^​
     
  2. cosmonaut

    cosmonaut No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Next time if you shot try a high f/stop. The light will have a very nice star effect...
    Cosmo
     
  3. TB™

    TB™ TPF Noob!

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    very noisy. you should use a tripod for night shots that way you dont have to bump up your ISO and you can experiment with different exposures.
     
  4. LaFoto

    LaFoto Just Corinna in real life Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well, I don't know what it was like before you started to work on it.
    But the one thing that I deplore is the fact that you took this night photo with a wide open aperture. So the street light became this big bright blob. Noise brought about by high ISO settings can still be dealt with by using NeatImage or something similar, but a wide open aperture cannot be changed into anything else in pp, I'm afraid.

    If that church is still there (which I am sure it is), and if nighttime still comes (which I think it does at very regular intervals :wink: ), then I would suggest you try a re-shoot with the camera on tripod and an aperture of f11 or less. And since you'll be having the camera on that tripod then, anyway, you can leave the ISO at its lowest setting, put the camera on timer, have it take its 6 - 15 seconds (whatever) exposure all by itself and ... voilà. :D
     

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