Nikkor 105mm f/1.8....anyone?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by DScience, Nov 6, 2009.

  1. DScience

    DScience No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hi all,

    So i've found a great deal! The Nikkor 105mm f/1.8 AIS for $200. Does anyone own this lens or have ever used it?

    I'm curious about its quality. How is the bokeh?
     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    May 1, 2008
    Messages:
    23,101
    Likes Received:
    3,767
    Location:
    UK - England
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  3. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,893
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  4. DScience

    DScience No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I've seen pics on flickr, but I was just curious of anyone has owned or shot with it.
     
  5. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    35,456
    Likes Received:
    12,797
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I would jump on one of those priced at $200. The lens f/1.8 105mm never really gained a lot of popularity, despite its good optics; the 105mm f/2.5 Nikkor was always the popular lens, and is a smooth-focusing, small,lightweight lens. The price offered is well below market value,so if you want it, I'd definitely say buy it; you could re-sell it to KEH.com for more than $200 if the lens is in good shape.

    It has been been a long time since I have picked up and handled a 105/1.8. My recollection is that the lens has a slightly stiff focusing ring feel, like the 135 f/2 AiS has. But that should not deter you. It's got a 62mm filter thread size, which will tell you that it's not monster-sized.

    Bjorn Rorslett rates the lens a 4.5 to 5, which means it's a very good lens on his 5-point scale,and he is one of the leading Nikon lens authorities.
     
  6. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,101
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Eddington, ME
    5 elements in 5 groups. It is a normal telephoto lens. Not a version of a macro! It's a high quality lens. Cost over 2x the older version 105mm f/2.5 telephoto. $200 for it is probably a good deal. Has a built in metal lens hood. Was considered good for candids, weddings, and portraits.

    62mm filter thread.
     
  7. DScience

    DScience No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2009
    Messages:
    1,513
    Likes Received:
    122
    Location:
    Denver, CO
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Thanks Derrel and ben...I am going to meet up with the seller early next week. I have a question for you guys, i've never purchased a used lens. What should I look for and pay attention to in order to make sure it's in good shape. Is there a way to best look for scratches, fungi, and dust?

    Thanks again, and I really appreciate the help.
     
  8. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2008
    Messages:
    6,252
    Likes Received:
    418
    Location:
    St. Louis
    I asked a similar questions in the past.

    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/...ery/125068-what-look-if-buying-used-lens.html
     
  9. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    35,456
    Likes Received:
    12,797
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Well, it could easily be a 25 year old lens, so I would expect some internal dust and flecks--even with hundreds of visible but small dust flecks, a telephoto lens like that will still shoot sharp, contrasty images. Expect internal dust.

    Scratches on the front element are of almost no consequence. Even rock dings on the front will not hurt image quality too much, unless shooting toward bright light sources. Simple scratches on the front are of almost no real consequence, but on the rear element, scratches or chips can have a dramatic and drastic bad effect. Look closely. Huff some breath onto the rear element and look at the condensation as it dries,and you can also see how well the rear coatings have been treated. Hold the lens up to a bright light source while standing in a darker area can show you the look of the rear element quite well, but might not be possible if you meet the buyer outdoors.

    Keep in mind, Ai-S Nikkors of that era had ball-bearing diaphragms, and the bearings can sometimes be heard shaking or rattling,and it is *normal* for a Nikkor lens of that vintage to have a sight mechanical rattle if you hold the lens up to your ear and shake it back and forth rapidly--again, normal.

    Slip the upwardly-pointed corner of a clean,new business card in between the barrel and the focusing ring and move the card around the ring in a sort of one-way windshield wiper motion, to pull down and out any grit or excess grease in there, and give an audible "tsk" sound and say, "hmm, looks like this lens is gonna' need a clean, lube and adjust," as you show the owner the cra) attached to the edge of the business card. Rotate the card and use all four corners. [ this is a negotiating tactic--use for another $25 off:lol:]
    Seriously-- there might be some crud in there.This method can remove large grit like sand quite easily,and will also, only occasionally, remove a lot of misplaced,excess grease that might be gumming up smooth focusing action.

    Expect the lens to be scratched up on the outside. Here's a lens buying tip on exotic older pro-level glass: the pristine lens might not always be a good lens. A well-worn, brassed, dinged up lens was carried a lot and probably shot a lot because it was a good sample of its type. Look at the edges of the mounting lugs on the back of the lens to get a feel for how much use the lens has had; some brass will show through on the edges of each of the three F-bayonet lugs. On a lens that has sen heavy,long use, there might even be a bit of brass showing on the rear bayonet's flat surface itself,especially after two + decades of heavy use.

    I own a LOT of Ai and Ai-S manual focus Nikon stuff. it can look very bad on the outside, and have dust flecks inside, yet still shoot superbly. Do not expect that it will look pretty. It might be shiny and new,and it might not, but the mechanical standard on the older, pro-level AiS stuff is very high,so even a really worn exterior is not necessarily a bad thing,and at $200, the price is well below fair market. I have bought a lot of used Nikkors: a quick d-slr test will reveal if the diaphragm is working properly and stopping down right; be prepared for a weird, thunky- feeling stop-down when shooting shots using many Ai or AiS lenses on a modern d-slr....the diaphragm actuation feels and sounds a bit "weird" compared with new, AF-S stuff like your 50 1.5 G.
     
    Last edited: Nov 6, 2009
  10. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,101
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Eddington, ME
    What Derrel said plus actuate the aperture tab to make sure they open and close freely. This lens was noted for having a tight focusing action. So, it may feel stiffer especially when compared to todays AF-s models. But like suggested hold the lens to your ear and listen while actuating the aperture and turning the focusing ring. Grinding noise is a sign of sand or other debris in it.

    Obviously look through the lens both ends. Point it towards a light source and move it around so the light source is at different angles. And obviously take your camera and mount it. Take some shots and use the zoom function on the LCD to check the shots (make sure its the lens and not a dirty sensor if you find something ;) ).

    As far as I can tell with internet searches, it was offered in late 1981 and sold through 1982. Not sure it had a longer production run or not?

    You do realize this lens will not meter on your D90? You will get focus confirmation light though.
     
    Last edited: Nov 7, 2009
  11. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    35,456
    Likes Received:
    12,797
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    This is the site I use most often when researching used Nikkors.

    Nikon Lens Serial Nos

    Roland Vink says March 1981 first production, December 2005 last production.
     
  12. benhasajeep

    benhasajeep TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    2,101
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Eddington, ME
    Thats a site to pack away for future reference! :thumbup:
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
nikkor 105 1.8
,

nikkor 105mm 1.8

,
nikkor 105mm f/1.8
,

nikkor 105mm f1.8

,

nikon 105mm 1.8 review