Question about Infrared...

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Shrimpy, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    I went to the camera store today to see if they had any infrared lens filters (which they didnt), but the sales person there told me that a DSLR like my Canon already has a filter before the sensor to block out an infrared light to begin with. He also said that the only way I could take infrared pictures with it would be to bring it in and have the Infrared blocking filter taken out.

    Can anybody confirm this, or was he just trying to make me spend money I don't need to? :???:
     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That's the best way - the estimates I've seen run $3-500 per camera, but then it basically becomes an IR only camera. You can also use an IR filter over the lens, but that runs into exposures of minutes and isn't terribly practical.
     
  3. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Not true. The filter does block most of the IR, so you need long exposures, but put an R72 or a Cokin P007 (I think an 89B works too) on your lens and you'll get IR photography. You need to use manual white balance and adjust colors in PS, but several people here do it that way. I'm currently looking for a used R72 so I can try it.

    If you take off Canon's filter, you'll ruin your dSLR for routine use.

    The BEST way to do it, of course, is to get another body and have the filter removed to dedicate it to IR (and you still need the IR filter in front of the lens).

    Here's an example from the forum of IR's done with an unmodified Canon 20D


    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=133284&highlight=Infrared
     
  4. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    Since I'm not really looking for any infrared shots that deal with motion, I think I can deal with the long exposures.

    Also I own a Canon Rebel Film camera, so i could always use that for any infrared shooting as well.

    And even though this is probably better suited for the film section, is there a certain type of film I would need to buy for infrared shooting, the sales person at the camera store wasnt quite sure?

    Thanks!
     
  5. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    There is IR film, but I think there are very few choices left (I think Ilford still makes one). I would suggest you find a new camera guy -- this one doesn't sound very knowledgeable.
     
  6. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    kodak is no longer making IR film, but check out Freestyle as there are others still available.

    Ilford's version is not really considered true IR, but comes close, you will still need at least a 25 filter with this film.

    Frankly, for me, Digial Ir is much easier, as film is so tricky, but it certainly has a different look.
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    There are 3 ways to do it with digital:

    1) Using an unmodified camera body put a filter that blocks visible but allows IR to pass on the lens. As has been mentioned, you are now shooting through 2 filters so exposure times are fairly long.

    2) Have the IR blocking filter removed from the camera body, and replace it with a visible light blocking filter. Makes IR fun and easy, but you have to dedicate the camera body to IR only.

    3) Have the IR blocking filter removed from the body, and don't replace it with anything. This allows you to use filters on the end of your lens to control what the camera is sensitive to. If you use a visible light blocking filter you get IR. If you use a filter that's like the one that was removed you get regular visible light sensitivity. Sensor are also UV sensitive, so with the right filter this allows for UV photography too.

    The band Stull with a fan. Shot with a 20D modified for IR by Lifepixel.

    [​IMG]
     

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