Reverse Mount Macro Adapter

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by ~myStical~, Feb 28, 2010.

  1. ~myStical~

    ~myStical~ TPF Noob!

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    I don't have the money to buy a macro lens for close up photos. So I was wondering if a "Reverse Mount Macro Adapter" do an OKAY job in getting some close shots?

    I own a Nikon D40, with a kit lens 18-55mm and also 50mm lens. Will a Reverse Mount Macro Adapter be compatible with my camera and lens? And which one should I get exactly ?

    Help me out guys , please !
     
    Last edited: Feb 28, 2010
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Get the Nikon BR-2A lens reversing adapter ring, which is suitable for Nikons with electronic contacts. It has a 52mm threaded end, and the other end has a Nikon mount. Many people would just say the BR-2, but that ring can, over time, wear and or ruin the camera's contacts, so you really want a BR-2A.

    2657 Nikon BR-2A 52mm Lens Reversing Ring

    it is $39.95.
     
  3. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    There are two completely different types of "reverse mount adapters" for close-up/macro use:

    1: The classic "lens reversing ring": These rings have a male filter thread on one end and a lens flange on the other. This is the type Derrel referred to. Nikon's BR-2 ring is this type of reversing ring. It allows you to mount any lens with a 52mm filter thread directly onto a camera body, or onto tubes or bellows, with the lens reversed (front element facing sensor). All functions, including iris stop down, are completely manual and there is no focusing adjustment, per se. When using zooms, there is some magnification adjustment available when you zoom, but the focusing ring does almost nothing. The 50mm f/1.8 works extremely well this way and many mid-range zooms (modest wide to modest tele) also deliver good results as some zoom settings.

    2: The rings most often termed "macro coupler". Theses rings have male filter threads on both ends. With this type of coupler, one lens is mounted normally on the body and the second lens is reversed and mounted onto the front of the first. This second reversed lens functions as a well correct and very strong closeup lens. All automation available in the lens that is mounted normally is retained and a modest amount of focusing is possible. Zooming will also produce a reasonable change in magnification. The reversed second lens should generally be a very fast lens; your 50mm f/1.8 will work well in this position. For the lenses you list, you would use one with 52mm male threads on both sides.
     
  4. lexdiamond20

    lexdiamond20 TPF Noob!

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    Got a knockoff on Amazon for about $12. Only played with it for about 2 mins. Seems to work. Not as good as a true macro but the next best thing. Needs tons of light and it wont meter or AF.
     

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