Rich colors, for fall

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by hammy, Nov 15, 2005.

  1. hammy

    hammy TPF Noob!

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    I want to capture some nice, vivid shots of the fall trees and leaves. I am wondering how to get real rich looking colors from my shots, is there any tip on how to? For color i've only used consumer grade film, should I look into professional films from my local camera shot if I want to get rich looking colors? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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  3. jadin

    jadin The Mad Hatter

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    The absolutely most important thing to do is shoot at sunrise or sunset. The light during these times is so warm and bold, there is really no other light even remotely close to how nice it will make your photos look.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Good point Jadin!

    A polariser and an ND grad filter might help if there's issues with the brightness of the sky or sun's angle.
     
  5. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Under-exposing slightly (maybe 1/2 stop) will also help increase saturation.
     
  6. Willc73

    Willc73 TPF Noob!

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    All of the above but please use good film. Use like a Kodak VS film or a good Fuji. Velvia might be too much saturation for you though? what format are you shooting?
     
  7. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Might want to consider also a warming filter.
     
  8. hammy

    hammy TPF Noob!

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    Thanks everyone. 35mm.

    I plan on using my 50mm 1.8 lens. I have a UV and polarizer.
    I did not know of warming filters but I will look it up. Any other filter suggestions?
    Should I be looking to use low speed film and a tripod for slow shutter speeds?
     
  9. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    A tripod never hurts to get optimum sharpness. Low ISO film should be finer grained than high ISO and needs a longer exposure. Filters also cut down light, so that's another obvious reason to use a tripod.

    Grad fiters can be useful as they can help even the lighting over a scene, thus making it easier to get a good exposure of sky and trees.

    Rob
     
  10. hammy

    hammy TPF Noob!

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    Thank you everyone...

    I went down to the local camera shop and picked up some Kodak PortraVC film.

    I'll use all the suggestions.
     

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