Shooting an event next Saturday...

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Lacey Anne, May 9, 2008.

  1. Lacey Anne

    Lacey Anne TPF Noob!

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    ...and I need advice. It's a 50th wedding anniversary party with close to 200 in attendance. It is not paid (I wouldn't take something like this paid right now as I don't have enough skill/equipment) but I want it turn out nice. It's my grandparents and I'd like to have enough decent photos to put together a nice photo book for them. I'm sure it will be a low-light situation but I think I'll be able to bounce my flash of the ceilings and walls. I'll bring my reflector as well and my assistant will be there (thank goodness), so I'll have some one to hold the reflector and what not. I don't have any strobes (soon though, I hope!) so I guess I'd like any tips on using the off camera flash and reflector for low-lighting. Also would love any tips and/or tricks for shooting in a crowd and getting nice candids. All I have lens wise is the kit and the 55-200mm. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
  2. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I would leave the reflector at home and have the assistant hold the flash (on a light stand or just strap it to a broomstick if you have to). I would also use a large bounce card and aim the flash straight up. Here is one you can put together quickly and looks pretty good if you are careful. One addition to this though, I would put together a Velcro strap to hold it to the flash rather than putting Velcro on my flash, were I you. You can glue a piece of heavy duty balloon, or other friction material, to the inside of the card to keep it from sliding on the flash if needed.

    http://super.nova.org/DPR/DIY01/
     
  3. Lacey Anne

    Lacey Anne TPF Noob!

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    Thanks, Mike. I appreciate that. I bookmarked the link to read when my kiddos aren't up and I can concentrate.
     
  4. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

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    I would pick up a nifty fifty. You would be amazed the difference between f/3.5 and f/1.8
     
  5. Lacey Anne

    Lacey Anne TPF Noob!

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    Haha, that's the next lens on my list! I really do want one!
     
  6. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The 50mm f/1.8mms are great lenses but will not help you shooting groups where you will need a minimum of f5.6 to have a table of people in focus.

    'There is no substitute for fast glass' is a favorite saying around here but the fact remains that sometimes there is no substitute for good flash work.
     
  7. Bevel Heaven

    Bevel Heaven TPF Noob!

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    yes it takes BOTH typically. good fast glass and a good understanding of using a flash.

    I prefer to bounce the flash straight up of off a wall to achieve a nice balanced soft natural looking light source, you will need to bump up your flash. time to do some reading
     
  8. rubbertree

    rubbertree TPF Noob!

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    I have no suggestions for lighting but can give you some suggestions on candid shots.
    My mentor shot my grandparents 50th wedding anniversary and I learned a lot from it. It was fun to watch him in action and to be in the receiving end as well.
    First he came to the house and took formal shots of the bride and groom together, then with my mom (their only child) then with all of us grandkids. They were lovely.
    At the reception he took candids of my grandparents mingling with the guests, with all of their friends, talking and laughing, he really captured the mood. My grandparents loved to look back on those pictures and tell us how they knew each person in the picture and their lives with them.
    He took pictures of my brother in his MC duties, of me giving the toast to the bride and groom, and of my mother giving her toast.
    One of the nicest shots was when my grandpa toasted my grandma and he actually got choked up, that moment was captured forever. My grandparents were not affectionate to each other but that evening they showed their love and what the previous 50 years had meant to them and it was all captured on film.
    My grandparents and my mom have all recently passed away and my favourite picture sits on my desk from that evening, it shows my grandparents looking at each other and laughing hysterically about something that one of them said, my mom is facing them and she is laughing to.
    Even though the formal shots are nice, I love the candids more. So be ready for those moments, let the mood guide you and let them act they way they do. Take care to notice those tender moments that a couple married for 50 years might not express anymore, or as often. Catch the laughter and the love.
    Okay, I've got to go wipe my tears away now...:cry:
     
  9. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Indoor evening shots almost always demand lighting. To me that almost demands off camera lighting.

    Nothing helped me more in that case than www.strobist.com for helping me out fast.

    Unless you have some incredible lenses and a camera that is fantastic at ISO 3200, off camera flash is your only alternative. :)
     

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