TMAX 100-400-3200???!! Whats up with that?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by OOID, May 31, 2005.

  1. OOID

    OOID TPF Noob!

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    I was just wandering if anyone knew why TMAX "skips" all of the ISOs between 400 and 3200. It just seems kind of weird that there is no 800 or 1600 in the mix, or is there and I just dont know about it.:banghead:
     
  2. Unimaxium

    Unimaxium TPF Noob!

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    It's probably the same reason there's no ISO 200. There isn't much use for an 800 or a 1600, since they're only a stop difference from either of the films, and you can always push or pull a stop if you want one of those ISOs.
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Notice the little "p" in Tmax 3200p; it stands for "push". Tmax 3200's real ISO is around 800 (I think it jumps to ISO 1000 with Tmax developer). So really we have Tmax 100, 400, and 800.

    Also Kodak says that you can shoot Tmax 100 at ISO 200 and Tmax 400 at ISO 800 without any change to development.

    With BW film you don't need every ISO covered, because they figure you can compensate in the darkroom.
     
  4. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

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    As stated above...... basically, the exposure latitude makes making the different iso numbers redundent. But don't assume that is the norm with every B&W film. The delta films by ilford have alot less latitude, so you have to change the development times with the changes in iso numbers.

    That's what makes B&W so much fun. You have the ability to tinker with all that stuff till you get something that works for you, rather then just getting what ever the lab gives you back.
     

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