what the heck? is it charging faster?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by newrmdmike, Jun 18, 2007.

  1. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    so i'm in thailand, and the outlets are 220v, where they are 120 in the states.

    i plug my battery charger in and i could swear it charges faster . . . i don't know much about electricity, can someone tell me if this is possible, true or if i'm losing my mind?
     
  2. Peniole

    Peniole TPF Noob!

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    I don't see how since your adapter converts to DC power at a set voltage and set amps.
     
  3. tataencu

    tataencu TPF Noob!

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    theoretically it could be possible because it overpowers your charger. but if your charger was built for 120V then it should be long before it goes into flames, your batteries blow or it just stops working.
     
  4. smyth

    smyth TPF Noob!

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    well, here's the thing. Thailand and other developing countries have electrical standards that are lacking or even unregulated.

    If you're socket looks like this:

    [​IMG]

    you should be very wary. Since this socket accepts both 120v and 220v appliances, it is possible that your charger will be getting a higher dose of electricity than 120v. Therefore, it is possible that you could be getting a slightly higher voltage, which is no that big of a deal, seen as the appliances are built to stand slight variations in voltage. (probably ~10v) Given that information, I suppose it might be possible that your battery would charge quicker.
     
  5. jon_k

    jon_k TPF Noob!

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    Gee, I'd really watch out for an outlet like that. I'd only plug an appliance in if it had a switch to switch between 110 and 220. Imagine plugging your desktop computer in to 220vAC when the power supply is set to 110vAC. Poof!

    Likewise, if your plugging your battery charger directly in to an outlet like that, I hope your charger has a switch to go between 110 and 220. Batteries are made to charge at a certain rate, going past that or overcharging can damage the battery, make it expode, and other bad things. If your using a converter to make the outlet into a US style, it's likely regulated power and safe (and your batteries should not charge any faster.)
     
  6. Peniole

    Peniole TPF Noob!

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    Most decent battery chargers I've seen, including my camera battery charger, my laptop charger...etc. all have 110-240v ratings, they assume you might be traveling using a "travel" battery charger. He would have fried his charger and batteries if it was a 110v only.
     
  7. Johnboy2978

    Johnboy2978 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    When I went to Italy and Malta, I bought some converters here in the states before leaving. The first time I used the charger w/ the converter, it completely burned up and smoked my charger. My batteries were fine (and charged quickly :) ) but the charger had to be thrown away. Thankfully, I had a charger instead of charging it through the camera. I too would be wary when dealing w/ foreign electricty and US electronics.
     
  8. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    the electricity is definatly screwy here, some 220 appliances run hot . . . bad stuff in the wires here. BUT, the charger says it accepts both 110 and 220 . . so i've been plugging it in, no probs yet.

    but it really does seem to charge faster . . . i'll time it and see how it compares with someone elses d200 batteries.
     
  9. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    oh, and thats exactly what all the outlets here look like. and i realize some things only work with 110, and have converters for those itemss, but the back of the charger says 100-240 is ok
     
  10. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    every modern charger should accept 120 and 240V automatically and even tings in between. Only if it gets way above, then there should be a problem.
    The charger itself should not charge considerably faster, since it is electronically regulated to give the same voltage and amps to the batteries, independently of the voltage input from the outer world.

    I do realise though, that with my (Canon) batteries, the time they need to charge from empty to full varies greatly ... with the same external voltage applied.
     
  11. shingfan

    shingfan TPF Noob!

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    technically....the charger is charing the battery at fixed DC voltage & current output no matter what the input voltage is (110 or 220)....so it shouldnt make any difference on the charging time.....you are probably thinking too much
     
  12. newrmdmike

    newrmdmike TPF Noob!

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    probably . . . . i would have thought it would have a fixed output . . . but it charged from dead to full in like 1 hr or less.
     

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