What's the best all around iso setting for a dslr?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by GreenGhost, Mar 12, 2008.

  1. GreenGhost

    GreenGhost TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Columbus
    I'm having trouble with light. it's either too bright or too dark
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Changing the ISO won't make your photos brighter or darker, unless you shoot strictly in manual.

    My rule of thumb is to keep the ISO a low as possible at all times...unless I need to either shoot with a faster shutter speed or use a smaller aperture (without sacrificing shutter speed).

    It sounds like your problem is with metering.
     
  3. GreenGhost

    GreenGhost TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 6, 2007
    Messages:
    12
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Columbus
    probably. just got this thing and still figuring it out

    thanks :thumbup:
     
  4. Seefutlung

    Seefutlung TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,558
    Likes Received:
    62
    Location:
    SoCal
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'd say there really isn't any. ISO rates the sensitivity of the sensor to light. The higher the ISO the greater the sensitivity, the greater the sensitivity the less light is required for a proper exposure. The trade off for greater sensitivity is noise (grain) ... the higher the ISO the more noise.

    Your choice of ISO will effect which shutter speed you use, which aperture you use or both.

    Each sensor has a "native ISO" ... this is the ISO which delivers the best Image Quality (IQ) in terms of noise (least) and dynamic range (most). For the Canon 5D sensor I believe it's at ISO 160 (but this may not be true for all/other Canon sensors).

    Generally , one will adjust the ISO to match the lighting conditions and allow one to handhold the camera without creating blur. In low light one would adjust the ISO up ... in bright light one will adjust the ISO down (typically the lower the ISO the better the IQ).

    This is just general info ... ISO affects and effects all aspects of exposure and consenquency is not easily or completely explained in a post or two.

    Gary

    PS- For starters a good ISO for most lighting (for a beginner) would be 200 to 400.

    G
     
  5. jols

    jols TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What iso should be set if I wanted to shoot my son running towards me or past me?
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    As low as possible unless you need a faster shutter speed.
     
  7. jols

    jols TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    thanks

    so if i need a higher shuter speed to freeze frame should i put the iso up?
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,817
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Pretty much, yes.
     
  9. jols

    jols TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    cool thanks for your time
     
  10. Sandspur

    Sandspur TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2008
    Messages:
    241
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pensacola, FL
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    GreenGhost,

    You're really asking about two different things: ISO, and why your exposures are either too high or too low.

    I know most of the others here will say change your ISO to suit conditions, but generally keep it as low as possible ... and I (generally) agree. But - contrarian that I am - I use ISO 400 all the time, on both my cameras ... unless there's an overwhelming reason NOT to. Of course, I've tested both of my primary cameras extensively, and found that 400 works wonderfully for both of them. You would need to do the same before making a similar decision.

    Now, on the other question: I agree with Big Mike. It sounds like you're not using your metering correctly, or your meter isn't working properly, or you're trying to shoot everything in Auto.

    We need more info to make a considered recommendation. Like - under what circumstances are your pix overexposed? Ditto for underexposure. Are you using flash? What kind of camera?
     
  11. jols

    jols TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2007
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ok mr. Sandspur, I have change my iso setting to 400 and gonna go out a take 100 pics tomorrow of different stuff and see what i think.

    I'm looking forward to it
     
  12. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    6,111
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Daytime? Night time? indoors, outdoors? With or without flash? The son running towards you is not going to be a factor... ambient or artificial light level... is :)
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
best all around iso
,
best all around iso for film
,

best all around iso setting

,
best all around iso speed
,
best all round iso setting
,
best iso all-around
,
iso setting for outdoors
,
the best all around meter setting is
,
what is the best all round iso setting
,
what's the best iso setting