50mm f1.4 AF-S

ranson

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Hey all i want to buy the 50mm af-s f1.4 lens can anyone please tell me the difference between the older series (D) and the newer series (G)...
I will apreciate comment. Thank you
 
Hey all i want to buy the 50mm af-s f1.4 lens can anyone please tell me the difference between the older series (D) and the newer series (G)... I will apreciate comment. Thank you
 
Hey all i want to buy the 50mm af-s f1.4 lens can anyone please tell me the difference between the older series (D) and the newer series (G)... I will apreciate comment. Thank you

Hi ranson, according to the official Nikon Knowledgebase, "The only difference between Nikon AF-D and AF-G lenses is that AF-G have no aperture ring."

This is a case where Nikon has removed a feature, called it a "new" lens, and is charging more for it ($469 for the 50mm f1.4 AF-G, and $334 for the 50mm f1.4 AF-D).

I would get the AF-D.

Hope this is helpful!

Bill
Hybrid Camera Revolution
 
I thought the AF-D would not autofocus on the D3xxx or the D5xxx series cameras where the AF-S will.

So it depends on which camera you have as to whether the older D series lens will work or not.
 
I thought the AF-D would not autofocus on the D3xxx or the D5xxx series cameras where the AF-S will.

So it depends on which camera you have as to whether the older D series lens will work or not.

Correct! The optics in the new lenses are reportedly slightly better, but the major difference is that the AF-S version has a built-in AF motor, and will auto-focus on pretty much every body out there for the last 20 years. The 'D' lenses, IMO, are superior in build-quality and less expensive, but you do have to turn that pesky focusing ring on your own.
 
If you do get the D, which I have, get a nice used one. They go around for about US$300.

Ever since I got the F2.8 35-70mm and 28-300, I use the 50mm much less now out of the convenience of lens swapping, but when it comes to critical moments, I know I had to put it on and every time I do, it never fails to amaze me.

Now if you can sacrifice auto focus, I'd highly recommend going for the Ai-S F1.2 50mm. Another amazing piece of glass.
 
I once owned it and I just never fell in love with it. I returned it and went back to a $99.00 AF 50mm F1.8D.
 
Thanks... I own a week and a half oldd600 it got a build in autofocus so i think ill be just fine with the D series. Thank you all..... :)
 
The "D" in a lens marks that it will give distance information to the camera, useful for better autofocus performance.

The "G" in a lens marks that it comes without an aperture ring, and needs the aperture set from the camera, electronically. All these lenses also include the feature of giving distance information to the camera, so the "D" was dropped.

However, all "D" lenses are also "AF", while "G" lenses are "AF-S".

"AF" means its an autofocus lens. But it has no builtin motor. This means the camera body has to offer such a motor. Not all AF lenses are D, but all D lenses are AF.

"AF-S" means its an autofocus lens with a builtin motor. That means (a) The lens works with newer cameras without an AF motor (b) the lens is more silent (c) the autofocus is more precise (d) in many situations, but NOT always, the autofocus is also faster. "AF-S" lenses are always "G".


The main advantage of old AF lenses is really build. They arent so plastic as newer lenses. They are also easier to use for some specific situations, for example adapters or for movies. Some newer cameras (such as the D600) do not allow to change aperture during movie making. With a "D" lens, no problem, just change the aperture at the lens itself (you have to allow the lens to change aperture in the camera configuration, though).
 
I guess this may be slightly off topic. But I have a 50mm 1.4 AiS and I think it's the beezkneez. The focus throw is pretty awesome.
 

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