another sensor cleaning post

paigew

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Hi!! So it was recommended to me to try and clean my own sensor. With my canon I think I had my sensor cleaned 6 times in ten years LOL. But my sony, I've had 6 months and it's SO dirty, I'm currently cloning spots of 1000000000000 portraits right now. Is this just bad luck or does the sensor get dirtier more easily on the mirrorless?

Any recommendations on what kit I can get on Amazon prime (have a shoot next week). Does it matter that I get the exact match size of the little cleaning swab (to my sensor)? Sony a7iii
 
Mirrorless sensors definitely get dirtier because they sit closer to the front of the camera body and have no mirror protecting them when the lens is off of the camera.

As far as cleaning kits go, I can't really recommend anything because I've never cleaned my own sensor. I spoke to my LCS about it recently and they advised to pick up a good sensor loupe and swabs appropriate for my sensor, but that's about it.
 
The sensor glass on a MILC is exposed virtually all the time whereas on a DSLR there is a mechanical shutter covering it until you press the shutter button(caveat, unless you are using Live View).

There are lots of options to self clean your sensor. Get a sensor loupe, sensor fluid and swabs all designed for sensor use, don’t try to McGiver a method as you risk scratching the sensor glass cover. Check cleaning brand videos for the correct method to accomplish a cleaning.

BTW, judicious lens changing technique can slow down the collection of particulates.
 
Here's the routine, from least invasive to most.
  1. Take your lens off, with sensor exposed. and holding camera upside down use a rocket blower or similar device to dislodge and clear as much as possible.
  2. Recheck for spots.
  3. If you still have spots the next step is to use a wet swab. Some people try the sticky glue stick, but I'll tell you it's really easy to get some of that stuck to your sensor. I use a wet swab like these https://www.amazon.com/VSGO-DDR15-Camera-Sensor-Cleaning/dp/B00THAT6HM they also come in full frame. Don't over saturate the swab or it will leave streaks. Starting at one side of the sensor press down until the swab bends slightly, then pull straight across. Do not go back and forth and do not reuse as swab.
  4. Retest for spots
  5. If you still have spots then it's likely grease/oil which the cleaning solution won't faze. NOTE THIS NEXT STEP IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. You can use either denatured alcohol or https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/458541-REG/Lumicon_LA3050_ROR_Residual_Oil.html I can tell you that I used ROR on some oil spots that wouldn't budge on the sensor of my K1 and one swipe they were gone. Just use it instead of the cleaning solution on your swab.
Finally, I can tell you that having one of these https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/prod...E2_Sensor_Scope_with_Bag.html?sts=pi-ps&pim=Y will make it a whole lot easier to see where the spots are on the sensor.
 
Here's the routine, from least invasive to most.
  1. Take your lens off, with sensor exposed. and holding camera upside down use a rocket blower or similar device to dislodge and clear as much as possible.
  2. Recheck for spots.
  3. If you still have spots the next step is to use a wet swab. Some people try the sticky glue stick, but I'll tell you it's really easy to get some of that stuck to your sensor. I use a wet swab like these https://www.amazon.com/VSGO-DDR15-Camera-Sensor-Cleaning/dp/B00THAT6HM they also come in full frame. Don't over saturate the swab or it will leave streaks. Starting at one side of the sensor press down until the swab bends slightly, then pull straight across. Do not go back and forth and do not reuse as swab.
  4. Retest for spots
  5. If you still have spots then it's likely grease/oil which the cleaning solution won't faze. NOTE THIS NEXT STEP IS AT YOUR OWN RISK. You can use either denatured alcohol or https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/458541-REG/Lumicon_LA3050_ROR_Residual_Oil.html I can tell you that I used ROR on some oil spots that wouldn't budge on the sensor of my K1 and one swipe they were gone. Just use it instead of the cleaning solution on your swab.
Finally, I can tell you that having one of these https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/prod...E2_Sensor_Scope_with_Bag.html?sts=pi-ps&pim=Y will make it a whole lot easier to see where the spots are on the sensor.

Thank you!! What do you think about this solution? https://www.amazon.com/Photographic...ZJK89ZRTCZQ&psc=1&refRID=YGKW229FSZJK89ZRTCZQ
 
I vote for the B&H kit, worked like a charm on my old D90. Get a swab sized to your sensor so you only have to make a single pass.
 
What do you think about this solution?

Eclipse is fine. I can't remember if the link on swabs I sent you has fluid with it or not. I ordered a kit that included swabs and fluid. However as I said earlier cleaning solutions won't faze oil or grease spots.
 
I had my Panasonic GX85 M4/3 for a year now heavily used and not a single spot of dust has shown up on my sensor but i also don't change lenses in the field. My Nikon D610 first few hundred shots had some lubricant crude that I had to wet clean it, but I have not had to do any cleaning after the initial few hundred shots and I do change lenses out.Thank god it didn't turn out to be a D600 slinger.
 
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Thank you! I bought some individually sealed swabs, some cleaner, and also the air blaster :D wish me luck!!

Okay, good luck! ;)

You can use the same swab "twice" in the same cleaning session. Complete the first pass on one side of the swab and try not to stop or lift the swab until you get to the opposite side of the sensor glass. Then flip it over to the clean non-used side and swab in the opposite direction, then toss the swab.

The main concern when cleaning is to remove any particulates first by either a electrostatic brush or air bulb(never compressed air), then a wet swab. This method prevents dragging dust, which may be tiny abrasive grains, across the sensor glass with a wet swab potentially scratching it. With care you will be fine.
 
Thank you! I bought some individually sealed swabs, some cleaner, and also the air blaster :D wish me luck!!

Okay, good luck! ;)

You can use the same swab "twice" in the same cleaning session. Complete the first pass on one side of the swab and try not to stop or lift the swab until you get to the opposite side of the sensor glass. Then flip it over to the clean non-used side and swab in the opposite direction, then toss the swab.

The main concern when cleaning is to remove any particulates first by either a electrostatic brush or air bulb(never compressed air), then a wet swab. This method prevents dragging dust, which may be tiny abrasive grains, across the sensor glass with a wet swab potentially scratching it. With care you will be fine.
thanks for all the info!
 
Thank you! I bought some individually sealed swabs, some cleaner, and also the air blaster :D wish me luck!!

I found that a glass of bourbon about 30 mins before I attempted cleaning the first time, helped relieve the apprehension. :biggrin-93::biggrin-93::biggrin-93::biggrin-93:
 
One thing that caught me off guard on the R6, which perhaps like your camera, has IBIS, was the sensor moved as I was cleaning it. I thought at first I had broken the mechanism and then realized that the sensor has to move for IBIS to work. Having said that, I'm going to go back to the manual and check to see if I missed a step that would have locked the sensor in place but I've never heard of that option.

Sensors have to be cleaned and they are designed for this so long as you are gentle.

Keep your swabs with you in the field. Once you do this you'll want to be ready to clean your sensor as needed ... hopefully not often.
 
One thing that caught me off guard on the R6, which perhaps like your camera, has IBIS, was the sensor moved as I was cleaning it. I thought at first I had broken the mechanism and then realized that the sensor has to move for IBIS to work. Having said that, I'm going to go back to the manual and check to see if I missed a step that would have locked the sensor in place but I've never heard of that option.

Sensors have to be cleaned and they are designed for this so long as you are gentle.

Keep your swabs with you in the field. Once you do this you'll want to be ready to clean your sensor as needed ... hopefully not often.
yes! I saw on a tutorial there is a way to lock it in place for cleaning. Hopefully that makes it easier!
 

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