Are you influenced by technique - or opinion?

Grandpa Ron

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Now here is a sign that I have been cooped up with the virus too long.

So, are you influenced by technique or opinion?

I like Black and White photography so I started reading books on shooting in B&W with digital and with film. It appears the reasons for shooting in black and white are as varied as the number of authors writing the books, who like to dwell the merits of B&W photograph.

Over time I became far more interested in how they made the shot I liked; rather than why they choose to capture that moment.

While I do not shun color, I happen to enjoy black and white. To me, trying to explain why, is like explaining why you like one type of pie, cake or beer over another. No reason I just do.

So my answer to the question is; I want to know the technique used regardless of why the photographer chose it.

I would think this applies to any field of photography.
 
I do not really understand your question.
 
I am influenced by what I see. I have yet to investigate why people do what they do. For me, I look differently when shooting black & white. I tend to look for light, shadow, and texture. I shoot a lot of B & W film and seem to get more from the gritty look of 400 speed film as opposed to digital. I look for color and theory when I shoot color. I look for intentional applied color off of the subject or scene. I still follow the light but I'm not hung up on it. I prefer digital at this point for color.
 
Ron, do you want your subject title to say "technique OR opinion?" Technique OF opinion is not hitting anything relatable. Or, are you asking people if they are more interested in hearing people's reasons for doing what they do, rather than the "how" they are doing it?

I'll be glad to change that title for you if you'd like to re-word the question. Just tell me what to do. :)
 
Terry you are correct it should be OR. It seems I have fast fingers and a slow brain these days. :)

Perhaps a better statement would have been "Are you influence by the photographers photographic techniques" or "Are you influenced by the photographers artistic approach to the subject" The photographer opinion of the proper choice of highlights, shadows and contrast etc.

I raised this questions because almost every book on black and white photography I have read lately dwells on texture, shading, highlights and contrast etc. Yet these things rarely come to mind when I view a photograph.

So, when other view a photo they like; is it the technique - Do they say "I wonder how they shot that; what shutter speed, aperture, filter, ISO, time of day etc."
Or, is it artistic approach that attracts them - Do you say "I like that photo because of photographer's use of light, texture, contrast etc."
There is no right or wrong answer and to some degree the two approaches overlap.

I am attracted to the photographic content and how photographer captured the image. I suppose the artistic balance is there at some subconscious level.
 
To often I hear people comment on an image "I wonder how it would look in B&W?". Like JC above I believe that decision should be made before you snap the shutter, rather then as an afterthought.

When viewing an image unless there's a specific element (processing, lighting, pose, etc) that catches my eye, I very seldom think about how the photographer got there, but consider the artistic presentation.
 
Er no, no. Maybe
No I am not influenced by other photographers style
No ditto. By their technical medthod
Maybe sometimes I will wonder of ask how a photo was done
My style is so far off the norm that others work style or method does not often apply or suit my style
I will often have an idea of what I want from a photo or project and then see if I can achieve it
I will cobble together all sorts to get the photo
Who else uses plastercine to hold pet uv urine detection torches on empty toilet roll tube to light up objects that have
Sprayed/painted in uv reactive Wildfire paint that is normally used in or for discos or fishing rod tips
 
I take photos for myself, my own well being, my love of this beautiful world we have been given. I am committed to continuous learning, trying all different kinds of photography, techniques, equipment, ... , towards that end. I find something new and try it for a while to see where it will take me. I started with film (Tri-X developed in HC110 is still one of my favorites). When I have explored enough, I'll move on to something else, but I now have another tool in my toolkit. If someone else happens to like an image I produce, great, I feel a bit of pride. If not, it doesn't stop me from continuing my exploration. So, as a great American lyricist enshrined in a popular song, "If it makes you happy, it can't be that bad".
 
Katomi,

I have found that strange is only strange to those who do not know why you are doing something. Once you explain what you are doing, it becomes just another unusual photographic approach.

Good Luck
 
If you've ever read some of the disscussions I've been involved in I don't give opinions any credit without evidence or facts.

The same holds true for photography. I like to know the how. Why someone takes a shot should be pretty obvious or the subject isn't that strong.
 
Thanks Ron
I like to do my own thing. Even I know that once I have done something a few times
The wow factor is gone a it’s just another fad. If others want to try my ideas I will help them
 
1. Perhaps a better statement would have been "Are you influence by the photographers photographic techniques" or "Are you influenced by the photographers artistic approach to the subject" The photographer opinion of the proper choice of highlights, shadows and contrast etc.

2. I raised this questions because almost every book on black and white photography I have read lately dwells on texture, shading, highlights and contrast etc. Yet these things rarely come to mind when I view a photograph.
1. They are the same thing.

2. Those are some of the more relevant aspects of B&W.
 
I did film photography in my teens.
B&w ilford fp4, and all the members at the club at the time were saying that I should do this, do that, copy the style of
The judges like this style....
in the end I was taking photos to please everyone apart from ..ME
I am not Ansal Adams or anybody famous
Getting back into photography I decided that I was not going to try and emulate others just do my own thing
I have been the friend at the wedding with a camera, my wife worked with the bride and others to set up a good shot
I just did the camera work, I don’t do people well. I know how to adjust settings, f stops, iso
But getting people to stand there, do this, do that, smile, don’t smile.......no don’t do well in that
Capture gran wiping nose of bridesmaids and all the other moments. I can often see them coming and in a lot of cases capture the moment. That’s my photography strength, I watch people, events and can often see what can happen and be ready when it happens
 
99.9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999% of the earth's population have IQ's many points above mine. (but a box of rocks is smarter than me anyway).

The technique used is their own and for me, I just enjoy the shot.

I too am curious at times how a shot was done, but emmulating it at least for me is a futile exercise in sophistry and frustration.
 
Designer,

I is true that they are related, perhaps two sides of the same coin.

Because I am subject driven, I tend to emphasizes the technical details of the photo. Others emphasize obtaining the proper composition.

In all honesty when viewing or taking a picture, I can never recall saying. "Wow what lovely texture or tonal balance etc. I find a well worn slightly faded 1880's photo of a old western rodeo just a appealing as a high speed, long lens, well mounted contemporary rodeo print.

Ansel Adams addresses both approaches in his three book series. He stress visualizing the scene as you want it on the print, where he discusses tonal shading and lighting, etc. He also goes into the details of camera angle, exposure, depth of field and the developer manipulation. There is no doubt he was a Master of both.
 

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