Camera Lenses for Industrial Manufacturer Marketer

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by MarcTheMarketer, Mar 6, 2018.

  1. MarcTheMarketer

    MarcTheMarketer TPF Noob!

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    Hi PhotoForum,

    I'm reaching out to the PhotoFourm Community to ask for some professional digital photography advice on lenses my company is looking to purchase for our marketing needs.

    To give a simple background of our company, we are an industrial manufacturer of machines involving the cutting or laser cutting of metal materials. As well, we do work with roofing shingles and building pre-fabricated buildings for various uses such as wind farms, water pumping housing, etc. (its all based on the clients needs). We do some engineering in-house as well, primarily electrical, industrial and laser engineering. The setting for the majority of our work is within our warehouse with also some outside shots for the buildings we produce. Our objective with the photos is to showcase the machines and details of the process of our machines.

    After all that said, we work with a Nikon D3200 DSLR camera and we would like to purchase new lenses for our marketing needs. After some research, we're thinking of these two lenses below.

    https://www.amazon.com/Nikon-AF-S-N...=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B001S2PPT0

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002D2VSD...2801|google.com|||66,21,83,26,3,31,79,10,1|1|

    We are looking at these two lenses because of the lighting situation (florescent bulbs) at our warehouse. Additionally, our machines we produce are big and want to capture the full size of our machines.

    We're looking for sound advice to help us with our photography purchase needs.

    Thank you all in advance!


     
  2. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Greetings!

    First; the lighting. You may not realize this, but you make the adjustment for white balance in your camera for JPEGs, and it is irrelevant for the Raw files. I strongly advise you to keep only ONE type of lighting in the room, so if it is fluorescent, then use only fluorescent, and none other. Set your camera white balance setting to "fluorescent" and when using a flash, place a green film over each flash.

    As for the two wide angle lenses you linked to, my questions are; what type of research did you do, and why did you settle on wide angle lenses?

    Starting from the beginning, what (besides the size of your machines) are your photographic requirements?
     
  3. MarcTheMarketer

    MarcTheMarketer TPF Noob!

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    Hi Designer,

    First, sorry for the late response.

    Thanks for the advice on the flash. We probably would need to use the white balance feature for our shoot as the lighting is good, but the lights themselves can ruin the photo.

    My research was done purely by Google. I came across this article describing the best Nikon DSLR Cameras. The 8 Best Nikon DSLR Lenses to Buy in 2018

    We haven't made a purchase on the lenses...yet. After speaking with my manager, he is 50/50 on buying the wide angle lens because it would be more cost-effective versus bringing in a professional photographer.

    Our photo requirements vary from events (tradeshows) to machines to general marketing photos.
     
  4. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    If it were me I'd seriously consider shooting at 50mm or more and setting the camera up to do panoramic stitches for the wide shots of your equipment, (or in other words combining several shots side by side). Possibly even manufacturing a rail set up to help. The reason for doing it this way would be down to perspective, wide angles squish everything into the centre of the frame and can play havoc with vertical lines. The other is distortion, wide angles generally exibit more distortion than longer focal lengths, this means that straight lines can appear curved. Shooting panoramic images helps to get round this by using a longer focal length where these issues are nott so pronounced. 50mm is also the closest to what our eyes see.
     

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