Camera vs smartphone

danisat

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Why a smartphone takes better moving pictures than My hx 90 v sony camera?
 

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Blurring in photos comes from two primary sources - motion blur caused by the subject moving and motion blur caused by the camera moving (ergo handshake).

Both are countered by the same thing, which is using a faster shutter speed. Chances are if you are using those kinds of camera you are most likely using automatic modes built into the cameras. Most default automatic modes tend to assume fairly slow motion, standard hand holding and adequate light (or a subject that can be lit with flash). So they are not pushing for fast shutter speeds suitable for a moving subject.
If you use their "sports mode" that is built into most then the camera will start to aim for a faster shutter speed, it might not get it right every time, but it should improve general results in good lighting.

Cameras can't tell what you are taking photographs of, though face detection and some motion sensors in them to detect their own motions can go a long way to helping out at times. So sometimes you've got to think for the camera. If your Sony has any manual controls you could use them, although manual on compact cameras can be a bit fiddly due to the way you have to access them (if you do for running or sports or action you'd ideally want 1/500sec or faster shutter speeds).


A final factor is also the cameras sensor size and built in editing. A smaller sensor might well hide some edge softeness, especially if the camera is applying a fair bit of sharpening to the photo. Ergo the photo might be "softer" but the smaller size (from the smaller sensor) and the built in sharpening might well hide that softeness.
 

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Why a smartphone takes better moving pictures than My hx 90 v sony camera?

Look at this three year-old video comparison of the video shot by a Samsung Galaxy Note 3 smartphone and the Canon 5D Mark III still camera...

This shows how great the phone shoots 4k video in bright, strong sunlight. 5D-II at 1080, neutral picture style, Sigma 24-70 f/2.8 lens. Phone in auto mode, f/13 at 1/200 second shutter speed. The Note 3 was one of the earlier smartphone to shoot 4k video.

The phone is applying quite a bit of sharpening and color has been "graded" shall we say, while in Neutral picture style, the Canon d-slr has a flat-type of image, which could be color-graded in software later to give equal punch as the smartphone video. As you can see, the d-slr video has wider exposure dynamic range.

It is impressive to see how good a smartphone's video image can be! Of course, in lower light levels, the video quality from a tiny smartphone sensor is not nearly as good as it is in bright,strong lighting conditions. And the phone has only the one, semi-wide-angle lens choice, and can not take use other, exotic camera-system lenses.
 
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danisat

danisat

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I'm talking about images taken indoors with people in motion ...
no gymnasts but regular movements ... and the photos with the hx 90 came out moved or out of focus compared to iPhone 6





Blurring in photos comes from two primary sources - motion blur caused by the subject moving and motion blur caused by the camera moving (ergo handshake).

Both are countered by the same thing, which is using a faster shutter speed. Chances are if you are using those kinds of camera you are most likely using automatic modes built into the cameras. Most default automatic modes tend to assume fairly slow motion, standard hand holding and adequate light (or a subject that can be lit with flash). So they are not pushing for fast shutter speeds suitable for a moving subject.
If you use their "sports mode" that is built into most then the camera will start to aim for a faster shutter speed, it might not get it right every time, but it should improve general results in good lighting.

Cameras can't tell what you are taking photographs of, though face detection and some motion sensors in them to detect their own motions can go a long way to helping out at times. So sometimes you've got to think for the camera. If your Sony has any manual controls you could use them, although manual on compact cameras can be a bit fiddly due to the way you have to access them (if you do for running or sports or action you'd ideally want 1/500sec or faster shutter speeds).


A final factor is also the cameras sensor size and built in editing. A smaller sensor might well hide some edge softeness, especially if the camera is applying a fair bit of sharpening to the photo. Ergo the photo might be "softer" but the smaller size (from the smaller sensor) and the built in sharpening might well hide that softeness.
 

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Even casual motion can be blurred on a camera if taken indoors as the light levels are often a lot lower than many cameras like, which is why many will pop the flash up when indoors. Whilst our eyes adapt to the dimmer conditions the camera requires more light in order to get that sharp shot; so its still the shutter speed being too slow to freeze the motion.

Raising the ISO or using the flash are two options most will use to overcome this lower lighting situation.
 
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danisat

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Even casual motion can be blurred on a camera if taken indoors as the light levels are often a lot lower than many cameras like, which is why many will pop the flash up when indoors. Whilst our eyes adapt to the dimmer conditions the camera requires more light in order to get that sharp shot; so its still the shutter speed being too slow to freeze the motion.

Raising the ISO or using the flash are two options most will use to overcome this lower lighting situation.
Ok
But the iPhone not use flash:)
 
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danisat

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What do you think?....
I buy an iPhone or buy a camera that takes good pictures inside?
:)
 

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Raising the ISO or using the flash are two options most will use to overcome this lower lighting situation.
Ok
But the iPhone not use flash:)[/QUOTE]

The iPhone might be choosing a high ISO which is another way to get shutter speeds faster. It might also have a wider maximum aperture as well. Without photos to compare in the thread its impossible to say what is going on, one can only guess at what might be happening and giving this big performance difference.

As for what to get that really depends what you want the camera to do. Do you want it for snapshots of friends at parties - then chances are the iphone (which also does all your phone needs and mobile internet as well) might well be all you need. but without knowing what you need and what budget you've got its really hard to say.
 

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