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Dark edged graduated neutral density filter to mimic defocus smoothing?

ethmoid

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I was thinking that it would be possible to mimic the Defocus Smoothing properties of Canon’s DS lenses by popping on a radially graduated neutral density filter that is clear in the center and dark at the edges. Does anyone know if this exists? It would be a more affordable way and a more versatile way to get defocus smoothing.
 
The only filter I remember which achieves that effect is the Hoya Center-Spot, which has sharp focus in the center and transitions to soft focus at the edges. An ND filter which darkens at the edge would just make the image edges dark and would not affect the focus.
 
Petroluin jelly smeared around the edge of a UV fiklter or even piece of thin glass?
 
Yup, petroleum jelly is old school, but be prepared for the mess. Plus it will attract every dust bunny, hair, fuzz, etc within 20 miles.

I have one of these Pictrol Pictorial Control Soft focus device don't think they make them anymore, but you can still find them on EBay. They work surprisingly well to give variable blur around your center. No ND though. I posted some examples back in 2018, here's one. The circular blur is entirely in camera using the Pictorial
flower06222018_383.jpg


The effect you describe can easily be produced in LR/PS using a radial gradient. Here's an example of the technique
Black Eyed Susans 20230430_6197.jpg by William Raber, on Flickr
 
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I would think that any decent processing software would produce the desired results without the use of latex gloves.
 
I would think that any decent processing software would produce the desired results without the use of latex gloves.

My image processing software can, but some of us who have been doing this for half a century or more prefer to get the image we want in camera.
 
Chap stick works well too. You can do circular, star, elliptical just wipe it off on a tissue and try again.
 
Used a clear plastic bag with a central hole held on with a rubber band. Futz with it to get the look you want.
 
Back in the day, we used Vaseline.
 
Back in the day, we used Vaseline.
Used it once, never again. Bloody mess resulted. Very little light blocking anyway. Various plug-ins with variable vignette options can do the trick.
 
Used it once, never again. Bloody mess resulted. Very little light blocking anyway. Various plug-ins with variable vignette options can do the trick.

Back in the day, 'plug-in' meant where you connected your appliances and TV to the electrical system of your house.
 
Back in the day, 'plug-in' meant where you connected your appliances and TV to the electrical system of your house.
Now it's a car--haha!!!
 
My image processing software can, but some of us who have been doing this for half a century or more prefer to get the image we want in camera.
LOL. Nice. I started in 1968, then I grew with technology.

Here's the thing: What you get 'right in camera' is simply the opinion of the engineers that designed your color science and every other aspect of your finished image. Most ISOs aren't even accurate. Sony, for example, underrates their sensors.

Every jpeg, HEIF, or any other processing that allows you to chimp on your screen is just your camera's interpretation of what you tried to achieve, based on someone else's opinion on what it should look like. I prefer my own opinion from a RAW file, thanks. You may continue to fool yourself if you wish.

If we're done being elitists, now, we can move on.
 

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