Does anyone here know computers or work on computers?

rexbobcat

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I have an issue with a processor that I just installed. Just curious if anyone might have dealt with a similar issue.

Mostly I keep getting a cache hierarchy error BSOD. I think it might be heat related, but I'm wondering what the odds are of the processor itself being bad.
 
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I'm assuming you simply replaced one processor with a similar one from the same product family and kept the same motherboard.

I recently upgraded my main computer processor a second time (on the same mobo) from an FX-4350 quad processor to an FX-8370 8-processor chip to improve photo and video editing speeds.

Perhaps the most likely cause of your problem is that various motherboard BUS speeds and RAM speeds and/or voltages are changed from what the old processor required. Sometimes, a new processor may require faster RAM as well. So, my first 'fix' would to be go to the BIOS setup screen (<DEL> during boot up) and take all the default values...think of it as full Auto on your camera. Hopefully, that will resolve the problem.

Another distinct possibility is that the power supply in your computer doesn't have enough wattage to handle a hotter/faster/bigger/energy-sucking processor. If you have a 300-watt power supply and 3-4 hard drives spinning, you might not have enough juice. Time to upgrade to a 450 or 500 watt power supply. <shameless plug> My favorite PS has always been those from PC Power & Cooling. I've used nothing but theirs for the past 25 years or so and NEVER had a power supply failure!

Perhaps the issue is RAM speed. Most 'normal' PCs are happy with PC-1600 RAM. Faster processors may want as a minimum PC-1833 or even PC-2166. For what it's worth, my current processor only needs PC-1600 but I use all 2166 as I'm overclocking the processor it at 4.7ghz.

Alternatively, it could be that the BIOS on your motherboard does not support the processor you installed. Just because all the pins lined up and the new processor dropped in doesn't mean the motherboard can 'handle it'. I was lucky this time and didn't have to update my BIOS, but I have in the past on various motherboards to resolve motherboard-vendor documented issues or faster processors. The timings and a whole slew of other processor critical stuff changes as one goes up the line of processors. Even voltages the mobo supplies may change with a different processor. So, go the motherboard vendors' website and verify that your motherboard (and revision number!) can handle the new processor. If you've just plugged in the biggest, baddest, fastest, hottest processor Intel or AMD makes, there's a VERY GOOD chance your BIOS will need an update.

Lastly, it could be an overheating problem. I put in the 'stock' CPU fan that came with my FX-8370 and everything was fine until I was exporting 150 photos from Lightroom and also discovered while exporting a 60 minute video from another editor. Fortunately, I saw it coming as I kept close 'tabs' on CPU temperature using the motherboard maker-supplied monitoring software that shows amazing detail. As I knew I was going to be overclocking, I ultimately installed a dual fan liquid-cooled CPU cooler. Now my CPU never gets hotter than 55 degrees Celsius!

I don't know if you need to go liquid cooled if your problem is heat related. Sometimes, simply installing an extra computer case fan to suck air into the case (near the bottom) and/or another one to exhaust hot air from the top area will easily solve the problem.
 
Turns out it was the processor. I thought it might be the BIOS, but this motherboard is the same socket as the processor I'm using, and I checked the website. Shouldn't be an issue.

Also looked at the PSU (Corsair RM650) but curious enough, it wouldn't BSOD with the overclocked Pentium G3258
(which used similar amounts of power as a stock i5/i7) that I'd been running for several months.

I ended up returning the used i5-4440 and purchasing a new i5-4590, praying to god that it wasn't my motherboard that was the issue. Just installed it last night and ran 25 rounds of the Intel Burntest at the very high setting. Highest temps with the stock cooler/thermal paste was 75, and I know that I will rarely, if ever, be taxing it to the extent that the burntest does.

It makes me think that the 4440 has a bad core or internal temp problems.

I'm just glad I don't have to break down the whole PC to diagnose the issue, because as clumsy as I am, I'd probably probably break one of the perfectly good components. lol
 
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Turns out it was the processor. I thought it might be the BIOS, but this motherboard is the same socket as the processor I'm using, and I checked the website. Shouldn't be an issue.

Also looked at the PSU (Corsair RM650) but curious enough, it wouldn't BSOD with the overclocked Pentium G3258
(which used similar amounts of power as a stock i5/i7) that I'd been running for several months.

I ended up returning the used i5-4440 and purchasing a new i5-4590, praying to god that it wasn't my motherboard that was the issue. Just installed it last night and ran 25 rounds of the Intel Burntest at the very high setting. Highest temps with the stock cooler/thermal paste was 75, and I know that I will rarely, if ever, be taxing it to the extent that the burntest does.

It makes me think that the 4440 has a bad core or internal temp problems.

I'm just glad I don't have to break down the whole PC to diagnose the issue, because as clumsy as I am, I'd probably probably break one of the perfectly good components. lol
Depends. Huge difference in CPU technology. I am late to the post but I would have asked you for motherboard model, version of board, and BIOS version. Many times, you will find a BIOS update(s) to support newer CPU technology and possible stability issues. If your curious, you could still provide me with the info and I could check to see if you just wasted time. I would also add, this is a classic example for updating your BIOS. Normally, it is not advisable to update the BIOS unless a specific issue is identified and the BIOS update address's it. I assume the chipset on the motherboard supports the CPU in question. Pretty rare to get a bad CPU.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 
Turns out it was the processor. I thought it might be the BIOS, but this motherboard is the same socket as the processor I'm using, and I checked the website. Shouldn't be an issue.

Also looked at the PSU (Corsair RM650) but curious enough, it wouldn't BSOD with the overclocked Pentium G3258
(which used similar amounts of power as a stock i5/i7) that I'd been running for several months.

I ended up returning the used i5-4440 and purchasing a new i5-4590, praying to god that it wasn't my motherboard that was the issue. Just installed it last night and ran 25 rounds of the Intel Burntest at the very high setting. Highest temps with the stock cooler/thermal paste was 75, and I know that I will rarely, if ever, be taxing it to the extent that the burntest does.

It makes me think that the 4440 has a bad core or internal temp problems.

I'm just glad I don't have to break down the whole PC to diagnose the issue, because as clumsy as I am, I'd probably probably break one of the perfectly good components. lol
Depends. Huge difference in CPU technology. I am late to the post but I would have asked you for motherboard model, version of board, and BIOS version. Many times, you will find a BIOS update(s) to support newer CPU technology and possible stability issues. If your curious, you could still provide me with the info and I could check to see if you just wasted time. I would also add, this is a classic example for updating your BIOS. Normally, it is not advisable to update the BIOS unless a specific issue is identified and the BIOS update address's it. I assume the chipset on the motherboard supports the CPU in question. Pretty rare to get a bad CPU.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk


Well these CPUs are all part of the same generation. The 4440 is about a year older than the 4590 (2013 vs 2014) but my BIOS version is May 2015.

The used 4440 also did this as well while trying to stress it, which makes me believe the chip itself was failing.

YbEU6mu.jpg


So far the new CPU has been working perfectly fine. With the used processor I would get a BSOD every 5-10 minutes even on idle. Nowadays processors and motherboards have become standardized to the point that you really only have to worry about getting the right manufacturer and socket. Features vary, but it would be rare for a motherboard to not support a CPU with the same socket.

I'm thinking the seller either didn't test it, or it came out of a pre-built corporate computer with OEM/manufacturer-specific parts and was on the brink of failure when it was removed.
 
Turns out it was the processor. I thought it might be the BIOS, but this motherboard is the same socket as the processor I'm using, and I checked the website. Shouldn't be an issue.

Also looked at the PSU (Corsair RM650) but curious enough, it wouldn't BSOD with the overclocked Pentium G3258
(which used similar amounts of power as a stock i5/i7) that I'd been running for several months.

I ended up returning the used i5-4440 and purchasing a new i5-4590, praying to god that it wasn't my motherboard that was the issue. Just installed it last night and ran 25 rounds of the Intel Burntest at the very high setting. Highest temps with the stock cooler/thermal paste was 75, and I know that I will rarely, if ever, be taxing it to the extent that the burntest does.

It makes me think that the 4440 has a bad core or internal temp problems.

I'm just glad I don't have to break down the whole PC to diagnose the issue, because as clumsy as I am, I'd probably probably break one of the perfectly good components. lol
Depends. Huge difference in CPU technology. I am late to the post but I would have asked you for motherboard model, version of board, and BIOS version. Many times, you will find a BIOS update(s) to support newer CPU technology and possible stability issues. If your curious, you could still provide me with the info and I could check to see if you just wasted time. I would also add, this is a classic example for updating your BIOS. Normally, it is not advisable to update the BIOS unless a specific issue is identified and the BIOS update address's it. I assume the chipset on the motherboard supports the CPU in question. Pretty rare to get a bad CPU.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk


Well these CPUs are all part of the same generation. The 4440 is about a year older than the 4590 (2013 vs 2014) but my BIOS version is May 2015.

The used 4440 also did this as well while trying to stress it, which makes me believe the chip itself was failing.

YbEU6mu.jpg


So far the new CPU has been working perfectly fine. With the used processor I would get a BSOD every 5-10 minutes even on idle. Nowadays processors and motherboards have become standardized to the point that you really only have to worry about getting the right manufacturer and socket. Features vary, but it would be rare for a motherboard to not support a CPU with the same socket.

I'm thinking the seller either didn't test it, or it came out of a pre-built corporate computer with OEM/manufacturer-specific parts and was on the brink of failure when it was removed.
Not really correct in your assessment but glad you got it sorted. You bought a used CPU? Yuck...Probably overclocked on a Asrock or MSI board.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk
 
Turns out it was the processor. I thought it might be the BIOS, but this motherboard is the same socket as the processor I'm using, and I checked the website. Shouldn't be an issue.

Also looked at the PSU (Corsair RM650) but curious enough, it wouldn't BSOD with the overclocked Pentium G3258
(which used similar amounts of power as a stock i5/i7) that I'd been running for several months.

I ended up returning the used i5-4440 and purchasing a new i5-4590, praying to god that it wasn't my motherboard that was the issue. Just installed it last night and ran 25 rounds of the Intel Burntest at the very high setting. Highest temps with the stock cooler/thermal paste was 75, and I know that I will rarely, if ever, be taxing it to the extent that the burntest does.

It makes me think that the 4440 has a bad core or internal temp problems.

I'm just glad I don't have to break down the whole PC to diagnose the issue, because as clumsy as I am, I'd probably probably break one of the perfectly good components. lol
Depends. Huge difference in CPU technology. I am late to the post but I would have asked you for motherboard model, version of board, and BIOS version. Many times, you will find a BIOS update(s) to support newer CPU technology and possible stability issues. If your curious, you could still provide me with the info and I could check to see if you just wasted time. I would also add, this is a classic example for updating your BIOS. Normally, it is not advisable to update the BIOS unless a specific issue is identified and the BIOS update address's it. I assume the chipset on the motherboard supports the CPU in question. Pretty rare to get a bad CPU.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk


Well these CPUs are all part of the same generation. The 4440 is about a year older than the 4590 (2013 vs 2014) but my BIOS version is May 2015.

The used 4440 also did this as well while trying to stress it, which makes me believe the chip itself was failing.

YbEU6mu.jpg


So far the new CPU has been working perfectly fine. With the used processor I would get a BSOD every 5-10 minutes even on idle. Nowadays processors and motherboards have become standardized to the point that you really only have to worry about getting the right manufacturer and socket. Features vary, but it would be rare for a motherboard to not support a CPU with the same socket.

I'm thinking the seller either didn't test it, or it came out of a pre-built corporate computer with OEM/manufacturer-specific parts and was on the brink of failure when it was removed.
Not really correct in your assessment but glad you got it sorted. You bought a used CPU? Yuck...Probably overclocked on a Asrock or MSI board.

Sent from my XT1254 using Tapatalk

I just mean most namebrand boards can handle CPUs of the same generation as long as the BIOS is up-to-date. The only issue would be using a $1000 chip in a $60 board. I wouldn't trust a hexacore processor in this board, but most enthusiast chips will work as per the manufacturer specifications and the BIOS updates, unless the chip is really new (like with the Skylake chips)

The used chip that I bought doesn't support overclocking, which makes the conditions the chip was working in just the more questionable. I just got a good deal on it - within a reasonably non-sketchy price - but maybe there was a reason for it. lol
 
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