Greenhorn here, few questions

bigtee44

TPF Noob!
Joined
Dec 28, 2015
Messages
3
Reaction score
0
Can others edit my Photos
Photos OK to edit
Hey everyone. I'm new in here. I was on a local photography group but I figured this would be a great place to read about some of the questions I've had that I've never had the time to google.

So about me and my camera. I'm kind of new to photography but have always loved the thought of knowing how to take great pictures. My wife was actually the first one to have a DSLR, a Canon XTi. She didn't really learn how to use it as if I remember correctly she had it in auto most of the time. After she didn't use it for awhile we ended up selling it and just had her point and shoot camera which did what we needed it to at the time. Fast-forward a few years and my wife gets pregnant and we want a nice camera to capture all of life's amazing memories. I'll admit I tried reading up on what everything does and I kind of understand but not enough to be able to go somewhere and know exactly what settings I want to be able to place my camera on.

As far as my equipment I was able to snag a Canon T3i with less than 5k shots with the 18-55 and 55-250 lenses for $300 on eBay. I have also bought the 1.4 50mm Canon lens and got for free a 35-80mm. I have the Canon remote, as well as a shutter release cable for long exposures(I want to test some night photography)


I will be taking into to photography at the local university starting in January so I'm sure I'll learn a great deal in that class but there's nothing wrong with more sources right?

Questions:

I'm looking to get into MARCO photography and I really wanted to get a 100mm Macro but with a new child I don't have the budget to throw that at a lens currently. I thought maybe a 60mm used might be more suitable for my budget with an extension tube. Then I started wondering if I used my 35-80mm along with a EF25 tube, would that be the same as the Sigma 105, or if I did my 1.4 50mm with a EF12 tube would that make it the same as the 60mm? Or should I just buy either the 60mm or hold out for the(non L) 100mm.

When shooting in MACRO do you actually want to be in the MARCO setting or do you just keep it in manual and control everything? I've noticed when I shoot in the MACRO setting it doesn't give me the ability to change all of the settings.

My Wife wants to get back into photography and says she wants her own camera because I just end up taking the camera away rather than showing her how to use it, so if she had her own I could just show her. Well with one of her reward programs she can get a Canon T5 (we want to stick Canon, so if you're going to suggest switching to Nikon, that's not going to happen) for her reward points she has plus like $165. Comes with the package deal, 18/55 and I want to say a 75/300 lens with a bag. I just was reading that I don't want to get anything older than a T6i.


When I say greenhorn, I mean as far as the technical stuff. Like when you say aperture or ISO I know where the buttons are and how to change the settings and outside of the shutter speed, I'm not exactly sure what they really do.


I'll include some of the stuff I've done just messing around trying to see what all this camera can do.


This is by far my favorite picture I've taken. No editing at all. Looks like the tree is on fire.
trees.jpg



IMG_8043.jpg


IMG_8061.jpg

IMG_8159.jpg


IMG_0781.JPG


IMG_1884.JPG


IMG_7159.jpg


IMG_7163.jpg


Thanks and I look forward to learning a lot here!
 

Attachments

  • IMG_0995.JPG
    IMG_0995.JPG
    1.1 MB · Views: 168
I'm looking to get into MARCO photography and I really wanted to get a 100mm Macro but with a new child I don't have the budget to throw that at a lens currently. I thought maybe a 60mm used might be more suitable for my budget with an extension tube. Then I started wondering if I used my 35-80mm along with a EF25 tube, would that be the same as the Sigma 105, or if I did my 1.4 50mm with a EF12 tube would that make it the same as the 60mm? Or should I just buy either the 60mm or hold out for the(non L) 100mm.

An extension tube will get you closer focus with any lens. At the same time you'll lose the ability of the lens to reach infinity focus so the extension tube is only good for close up photos. It's a budget way to go because typically the lens you're extending wasn't really designed to work well in that distance range. You might find things like sharpness dropping off in the corners, but that's also often inconsequential in a lot of macro photos.

When shooting in MACRO do you actually want to be in the MARCO setting or do you just keep it in manual and control everything? I've noticed when I shoot in the MACRO setting it doesn't give me the ability to change all of the settings.

Avoid the macro scene mode of the camera. Avoid all the scene modes of the camera and start using the camera in it's semi-auto modes like TV, AV and P. The macro scene mode does not add functionality.

Joe

EDIT: Welcome to TPF. Where are you?
 
Hi Bigtee and welcome to the forum. No, your camera doesn't have to be in "Macro mode" in order to take macro images. Most of the time I shoot in Av (A on Nikon) or fully manual. I have 105mm f/2.8 VR macro lens. For larger bugs like butterflies and beetles, it's fine. If I'm shooting still life (flowers, coins, random objects), I tend to opt for manual focus for more precision.

For smaller subjects, I also shoot with a reversed 28mm f/2.8 Ai-s lens. This gives me significantly more magnification than the 1:1 ratio of the 105mm. The working distances are greatly reduced (just a few inches) but if it's a still life subject or a bug that can't fly and is sitting still, then no big whoop. I've attached an image of a jumping spider that was about 5mm in size. I shot it with a reversed 28mm lens. You can always add extension tubes too, to increase magnification still further but depth of field becomes very shallow and you are entering into the realms of requiring focus stacking and advanced macro photography techniques and equipment.

An extension tube would work quite well on the 50mm, but if the magnification isn't powerful enough for what you want, just look on eBay for an old manual focus, manual aperture 28mm lens and a reverse mount adapter of the same filter size (probably 52mm or 55mm).
 

Attachments

  • Beauty-&-The-Beast.jpg
    Beauty-&-The-Beast.jpg
    55.9 KB · Views: 119
I'm looking to get into MARCO photography and I really wanted to get a 100mm Macro but with a new child I don't have the budget to throw that at a lens currently. I thought maybe a 60mm used might be more suitable for my budget with an extension tube. Then I started wondering if I used my 35-80mm along with a EF25 tube, would that be the same as the Sigma 105, or if I did my 1.4 50mm with a EF12 tube would that make it the same as the 60mm? Or should I just buy either the 60mm or hold out for the(non L) 100mm.

An extension tube will get you closer focus with any lens. At the same time you'll lose the ability of the lens to reach infinity focus so the extension tube is only good for close up photos. It's a budget way to go because typically the lens you're extending wasn't really designed to work well in that distance range. You might find things like sharpness dropping off in the corners, but that's also often inconsequential in a lot of macro photos.

When shooting in MACRO do you actually want to be in the MARCO setting or do you just keep it in manual and control everything? I've noticed when I shoot in the MACRO setting it doesn't give me the ability to change all of the settings.

Avoid the macro scene mode of the camera. Avoid all the scene modes of the camera and start using the camera in it's semi-auto modes like TV, AV and P. The macro scene mode does not add functionality.

Joe

EDIT: Welcome to TPF. Where are you?

I'm not even sure what any of those settings do, I thought that was to plug your camera into the TV. Looks like I have a lot more learning to do than I thought.

I'm from the great state of Michigan!
 
Hi Bigtee and welcome to the forum. No, your camera doesn't have to be in "Macro mode" in order to take macro images. Most of the time I shoot in Av (A on Nikon) or fully manual. I have 105mm f/2.8 VR macro lens. For larger bugs like butterflies and beetles, it's fine. If I'm shooting still life (flowers, coins, random objects), I tend to opt for manual focus for more precision.

For smaller subjects, I also shoot with a reversed 28mm f/2.8 Ai-s lens. This gives me significantly more magnification than the 1:1 ratio of the 105mm. The working distances are greatly reduced (just a few inches) but if it's a still life subject or a bug that can't fly and is sitting still, then no big whoop. I've attached an image of a jumping spider that was about 5mm in size. I shot it with a reversed 28mm lens. You can always add extension tubes too, to increase magnification still further but depth of field becomes very shallow and you are entering into the realms of requiring focus stacking and advanced macro photography techniques and equipment.

An extension tube would work quite well on the 50mm, but if the magnification isn't powerful enough for what you want, just look on eBay for an old manual focus, manual aperture 28mm lens and a reverse mount adapter of the same filter size (probably 52mm or 55mm).

That's an amazing photo! I know I've heard of the reverse lens thing before, but don't you have to hold it in place and then dust will get into your camera body?
 
I'm looking to get into MARCO photography and I really wanted to get a 100mm Macro but with a new child I don't have the budget to throw that at a lens currently. I thought maybe a 60mm used might be more suitable for my budget with an extension tube. Then I started wondering if I used my 35-80mm along with a EF25 tube, would that be the same as the Sigma 105, or if I did my 1.4 50mm with a EF12 tube would that make it the same as the 60mm? Or should I just buy either the 60mm or hold out for the(non L) 100mm.

An extension tube will get you closer focus with any lens. At the same time you'll lose the ability of the lens to reach infinity focus so the extension tube is only good for close up photos. It's a budget way to go because typically the lens you're extending wasn't really designed to work well in that distance range. You might find things like sharpness dropping off in the corners, but that's also often inconsequential in a lot of macro photos.

When shooting in MACRO do you actually want to be in the MARCO setting or do you just keep it in manual and control everything? I've noticed when I shoot in the MACRO setting it doesn't give me the ability to change all of the settings.

Avoid the macro scene mode of the camera. Avoid all the scene modes of the camera and start using the camera in it's semi-auto modes like TV, AV and P. The macro scene mode does not add functionality.

Joe

EDIT: Welcome to TPF. Where are you?

I'm not even sure what any of those settings do, I thought that was to plug your camera into the TV. Looks like I have a lot more learning to do than I thought.

I'm from the great state of Michigan!

On a Canon camera Tv is Time Value, Av is Aperture Value and P is Program. I recommend you set the camera to P -- Program mode.

In Tv mode you can lock down the shutter speed (time) and the camera will auto adjust the aperture and/or ISO.
In Av mode you can lock down the aperture and the camera will auto adjust the shutter speed and/or ISO.
In P mode the camera will auto adjust both the shutter speed and aperture and/or ISO.

You camera is equipped with a light meter -- measures the intensity of the light reflected back from your subject (variable). The sensor in the camera is light sensitive (constant). The shutter passes light over time and the aperture is an iris in the lens that passes more or less light. The shutter and lens aperture have to be adjusted to expose the sensor (constant sensitivity) to a measured amount of light and can be adjusted to do that in response to the variable amount of light that the meter measures reflected from your subject. The software in your camera can set all that up for you but eventually you'll want to start making that call yourself as you learn.

For example the shutter not only exposes the sensor to light when it opens it also controls the rendition of motion in the photo. Fast shutter speeds (1/2000 sec.) freeze action while slower shutter speeds (1/20 sec) blur motion.

Joe
 
Hey everyone. I'm new in here. I was on a local photography group but I figured this would be a great place to read about some of the questions I've had that I've never had the time to google.

So about me and my camera. I'm kind of new to photography but have always loved the thought of knowing how to take great pictures. My wife was actually the first one to have a DSLR, a Canon XTi. She didn't really learn how to use it as if I remember correctly she had it in auto most of the time. After she didn't use it for awhile we ended up selling it and just had her point and shoot camera which did what we needed it to at the time. Fast-forward a few years and my wife gets pregnant and we want a nice camera to capture all of life's amazing memories. I'll admit I tried reading up on what everything does and I kind of understand but not enough to be able to go somewhere and know exactly what settings I want to be able to place my camera on.

As far as my equipment I was able to snag a Canon T3i with less than 5k shots with the 18-55 and 55-250 lenses for $300 on eBay. I have also bought the 1.4 50mm Canon lens and got for free a 35-80mm. I have the Canon remote, as well as a shutter release cable for long exposures(I want to test some night photography)


I will be taking into to photography at the local university starting in January so I'm sure I'll learn a great deal in that class but there's nothing wrong with more sources right?

Questions:

I'm looking to get into MARCO photography and I really wanted to get a 100mm Macro but with a new child I don't have the budget to throw that at a lens currently. I thought maybe a 60mm used might be more suitable for my budget with an extension tube. Then I started wondering if I used my 35-80mm along with a EF25 tube, would that be the same as the Sigma 105, or if I did my 1.4 50mm with a EF12 tube would that make it the same as the 60mm? Or should I just buy either the 60mm or hold out for the(non L) 100mm.

When shooting in MACRO do you actually want to be in the MARCO setting or do you just keep it in manual and control everything? I've noticed when I shoot in the MACRO setting it doesn't give me the ability to change all of the settings.

My Wife wants to get back into photography and says she wants her own camera because I just end up taking the camera away rather than showing her how to use it, so if she had her own I could just show her. Well with one of her reward programs she can get a Canon T5 (we want to stick Canon, so if you're going to suggest switching to Nikon, that's not going to happen) for her reward points she has plus like $165. Comes with the package deal, 18/55 and I want to say a 75/300 lens with a bag. I just was reading that I don't want to get anything older than a T6i.


When I say greenhorn, I mean as far as the technical stuff. Like when you say aperture or ISO I know where the buttons are and how to change the settings and outside of the shutter speed, I'm not exactly sure what they really do.


I'll include some of the stuff I've done just messing around trying to see what all this camera can do.


This is by far my favorite picture I've taken. No editing at all. Looks like the tree is on fire.
View attachment 113439


View attachment 113436

View attachment 113437
View attachment 113438

View attachment 113440

View attachment 113442

View attachment 113443

View attachment 113444

Thanks and I look forward to learning a lot here!



I'd say slow down and take things as they come. You'll be taking a photography class and there you will have a program you'll follow which will provide information in a more structured manner than just asking questions about this and that.

Right now, work primarily on becoming familiar with your camera.

Sit down with the camera and the owner's manual and read what Canon says. Share with your wife.

Take sample photos and play with controls.

When using a digital camera none of your sample shots are costing you a penny if you simply delete them later.

However, the more you know about your camera and the more familiar you are with your camera and its operation plus it limits and strengths, the more comfortable you will be when you are taking "real" photos.



Photography is like most skills where you are trying to put into reality that image you have in your head.

Now, not all people are "visual" types and they may struggle with the creative aspects of photography. On the other hand, not all people are "tactile" personalities and they may struggle with the technical aspects of photography while finding the creative to be quite simple. Eventually, you want to realize what your natural strengths are (and those of your wife) and use them to develop those areas where you are weakest. You do that by taking photographs. Then, once you have taken a bunch of photographs you look at what you've accomplished and become critical of your strengths and weaknesses. Save those images for comparison in six month's and one year's time. But keep on taking photos and don't fall into the trap of thinking more equipment will make you a better photographer. For the most part, more gear will simply make you the same photographer with more gear you don't understand.

More gear should be your last resort only when you know you cannot accomplish more with your photography and your current hardware/software. The software that must be used to process a digital image file makes a lot of extra equipment redundant.




Read the archives of this section of the forum. You'll find plenty of suggestions for learning photography. One essential though is to develop what can't really be taught; how to take what you see in your head and turn it into a reality in your camera. For that you need to fully understand how to control your camera rather than allowing it to control your photography.

Becoming so familiar with your camera that you don't really have to think about how it should be set and how to reach that setting is a large part of allowing your creativity through to the front. If the best photographer is the one having the most fun, the worst photographer is the one becoming frustrated with their equipment. So read the manual and work the camera as often as possible before your class begins. It will pay its dividends once you are given an assignment.


You'll need some software to complete your vision. That's part of digital photography too. Take each part as it comes and allow yesterday's lesson to inform today's experience. That really is what a good instructor should be doing for you; building the foundations and then going upward from there.



There are tutorials on this forum and a glossary of terms you can browse through. I would suggest you begin with the basics of "exposure" which will give you a better grounding in aperture, shutter speed and ISO values.




If your wife wants another camera, possibly you should consider not another lens for macro work but a complete camera that will work well for macro and other uses. The Canon SX series (40/50/60) cameras are all well known for their macro work. They are considered bridge superzooms and they make, IMO, excellent companions to a DSLR; Fatdragon100's Canon Powershot SX40 Vids - YouTube

Animal Kingdom.... SX50: Canon PowerShot Talk Forum: Digital Photography Review

Favorite Canon SX50 HS Photographs - Tony Britton



The SX40/SX50 are now discontinued and can often be found at Canon's on line sales in refurbished condition (with a warranty) for well under $249; Search Results

Availability varies with stock, and often by color, but watch the site for a good deal. The SX series has the most significant features of a DSLR however it is a single, fixed lens with large zoom power and excellent "macro" operation. It's also slightly smaller in total size than most Canon DSLR's so there's less bulk to haul around.
 

Most reactions

New Topics

Back
Top