Hassy 120mm lens/prism viewfinder question

Discussion in 'Medium Format & Large Format' started by nickTheCut, Feb 5, 2018.

  1. nickTheCut

    nickTheCut TPF Noob!

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    My Polaroid back has given me quick results. This just in...
    Viewfinder
    IMG_2498.JPG
    Polaroid
    IMG_2499.JPG

    My problem solved :)

    Now... what was that insert used for, or benefit?

    In my defense, it’s my first Hasselblad and would never deface a vintage camera body. Thank you all who thought with me and helped me come to this conclusion.


     
  2. nickTheCut

    nickTheCut TPF Noob!

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    They way you appreciate the 150mm is the way I fewl about the 120mm.


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  3. Dave Colangelo

    Dave Colangelo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    There are a few things it was used for.

    Its possible the owner had some kind of printing limitation and it was inserted to denote the margins, this seems somewhat unlikely and irregular though.

    Its more than likely the previous owner had one of the early digital backs that had a smaller sensor. Even the new digital backs don't cover the full 6x6 frame size although they are better than the early ones.

    Its possible this was a crop mask for a film back but it does not seem to be in the shape/crop of any film back I know of for the camera. Hasselblad did make a A-16 back with the 645 crop factor, if you have a small ruler you can check the measurements.
     
  4. chris

    chris No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It is probably to show the image cropped to the 4x4 cm format which would allow a slide to fit in the appropriate 5x5 cm holder and so be projected in a 'standard' 35 mm projector rather than use a 7x7 cm slide holder and a bigger, usually more expensive, and often manual projector needed for the full 6x6 frame.
     
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  5. nickTheCut

    nickTheCut TPF Noob!

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    Excellent info guys. Makes sense. The mask was taped off to a template and done well, so it seemed somewhat original. I wouldn’t of ever thought to deface the camera. I’m so excited to have a solution to my problem.
    I brought this up in a different digital friendly forum, and got horrible feedback. I personally want to crest beautiful negatives that need as little cropping as possible. The other forum acted as though my goal to not want to crop was stupid. So glad to have found this medium format film zone:)


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  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    The so-called SuperSlide format. Medium format film shots that could be projected in a 35mm projector. That was my thought when the question appeared. And that's why the A16S film magazine was produced; it gave of course, 16 4 x 4 cm images, and my feeling is that the 'S' part of the A16S film magazine from Hasselblad meant "slides" or "SuperSlide! The A16 magazine shot 4 x 6.5 cm images.

    As I recall, the "baby Rolleiflex" in 127 film format was a 4x4cm capture camera. I had an old, 1960 (?) Montgomery Ward's photography catalog back when I was a kid, and it has a section dedicated to "SuperSlide photography" as they called it. One of the featured cameras in that subsection was a gray "baby Rollei". Oh, how I wanted one!
     

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