How do you carry your camera, lens, etc

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by PJcam, Feb 4, 2018.

  1. PJcam

    PJcam No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I would find it interesting to know how you guys carry your camera's and lens, etc.

    I have purchase several bags, the main one that suits most of my items is a like a back pack bag, that has to be removed and unzips with access to everything from the back side of the bag, meaning if it was on my back, or on the back of my power wheel chair. Most items fit in the bag, camera, 3 lens, filters, lens cleaner etc.

    But then I have the Tamron 150-600mm G2 lens. I purchased another bag for this, well padded and fits snugly inside, but having extra bags, especially the smaller one for the more expensive larger lens I realise it could easily be knocked! Not a good idea! I may readjust and put the Tamron lens in the main bag and have smaller lenses in another bag, but I thought I would ask the question on here, knowing you guys are out and about, and are used to carrying your equipment and making sure it doesn't get knocked.

    All comments welcome, thank you.


     
  2. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Generally most photographers start the hobby with one bag that fits everything they own
    By the end of things they'll typically have a load of bags which will each only fit part of the kit.

    When you start its easy to carry it all with you because most of the entry level stuff is smaller and lighter. So you easily get into the habit of having it all and using whatever you want at the time. However as you gain more gear - esp if you gain higher end and especially so if its longer lenses; it starts to become important to prioritize what you do and don't take; as sometimes carrying it all you might find you only actually use one or two items. Experience (of photography and the site you're going too) all help in letting you evaluate what you might need and what is best left behind.

    Carrying stuff is also fairly personal, myself I've a few bags depending on the situation;

    1) A large messenger bag. This is almost the size of a backpack, but with a sling instead of two straps. It's the bag I like to use if I'm going to a zoo, reserve or event where I expect to move to a single spot and then not move around a huge amount once there. Or where if I am moving around its shorter distances. The bonus is that the bag lets me pick it up and drop it off and also dip in and out to get a lens or lens and camera quickly, without having to unzip or zip it up again (as one might with a backpack).
    However I'd never take it on a long hike or to a place where mobility was important (unless I was able to leave it in one spot and move around in the area around it).

    2) A large backpack. For me this is my bag that will hold pretty much nearly everything I own. It's the kind of bag I might take on a trip so that I can leave it behind in the room/hotel/wherever and then use a smaller bag or just carry gear whilst going out and around. I can also use it if I'm carying more lighting gear rather than just lenses and cameras.
    And because its a backpack the weight is kept on the shoulders and waist band so its a lot easier to carry heavy gear. If I owned more than one big prime/zoom lens its the bag I'd reach for to carry both as it would put weight on both shoulders and the waist rather than the shoulderbag above which would only lump it all on one side.

    3) A medium backpack. My go-to does everything kind of bag that isn't too big nor bulky and yet will hold a good amount of gear. A good generalist backpack for a trip out to anywhere. Protects the gear, lets me carry a few items and because its on my back it keeps weight on the shoulders and waist; so its a lot easier to carry over longer distances or at places where I'm not sure (in advance) if I'll be mobile or seated.

    4) A small shoulderbag. This is the one I actually started with that, for a time, could hold all my gear (it can't now). It will hold a camera body and a couple of small lenses or a lens and flash. It's my bag I keep my old camera and entry level gear in - useful if going somewhere where photography isn't the focus and where the camera could come to harm or might be left unattended for a while (ergo its the gear I can afford to lose - not that I want to lose it, but I won't lose sleep over it).



    Sooooo as you can see its easy to end up with quite a few variations! There's also loads of bags out there with pockets and different entry methods and all kinds of funky features. So often the best way to choose a bag is to get some photography experience and then head to a local shop and take your gear with you - then try out a few bags. For yourself on a wheelchair you might well find this a very important step as if you want to gain access to the bag you might find some shapes easier to swing around to reach; whilst others might be very well reviewed, but prove impractical when you are out and around (esp if alone - eg a quiet day in the bird hide when you're the only one there).
     
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  3. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    A large bag in the car with everything I plan to use. Everything else is left at home. When I leave the car I normally carry only my camera, a single lens, and [optionally] a tripod. If I need anything else (filters, speedlight, etc.) it goes in jacket pockets.
     
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  4. jcdeboever

    jcdeboever TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    I don't typically use a bag, even two gunning it. One camera, one lens. If two gunning it, a wide and a telephoto. Film, 28 or 35 and a 55 or 100. Digital, 16 or 23 and a 60 or 80. I put them in the center console of my truck. The only time I use a bag is if I'm bringing lighting gear.
     
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  5. espresso2x

    espresso2x No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use a messenger bag: 3x cameras and lenses, an extra lens, batteries, flash, sync cable. I have a compact camera in my coat pocket. No lens caps. Hat and gloves, scarf. I try to avoid major damage to the gear but i'm not precious about using it.
     
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  6. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    These days I use a black Tenba large messenger bag - 17" x 10" x 9".
    Pros
    It doesn't look like a camera bag
    Holds a surprising amount of stuff (2 DSLRs, 2 lenses (up to 85 mm), speedlight, radio trigger, batteries/charger, and all the other stuff I need.)
    The main compartment is easily customized.
    Excellent padding on the shoulder strap, maybe the best in the industry.

    Cons
    No cool factor or sex appeal. Wait maybe that's actually a Pro.
     
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  7. Destin

    Destin Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Well.. as my gear collection has grown so has my selection of bags and cases.

    I have a pelican 1560sc case that all my cameras, lenses, filters, and speedlights live in when at home or when taking everything on a trip.

    I have a smaller 1510sc case that I use as a carry on when I travel or when I don’t need to bring quite as much but still want a hard case. Only have this because I got it before the 1560 and then outgrew it.

    I have a mindshift backlight 36l backpack that I use for day trip hiking.. holds as much gear as I need as well as extra clothes, food, water, etc.

    Beyond that I have a few small messenger bags and a few smaller backpacks that I can piece out smaller kids for different purposes.

    I have an addiction to bags. I’m still looking for the perfect bag for a few different applications. When I was carrying my D500 with a 150-600 on it, I had an old 1970’s bag that looked like a long lunchbox. It fit the combo perfectly for when it’s all I wanted to carry. Lowepro currently makes a few bags designed for a body with a large lens attached; one of those may work well for you.
     
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  8. john.margetts

    john.margetts No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use a fairly large shoulder bag (which never goes on my shoulder!) that contains all my digital kit. When I go out, it stays in the car and I remove the body and lens (possibly two lenses) that I am going to use on that session. Any peripherals (filters, remote release, battery, cards) go in my pocket.

    For film work, I have two smaller bags - one for medium format and one for 35 mm. These bags I will carry with me rather than leave in the car.
     
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  9. zombiesniper

    zombiesniper The camera takes the Pic. I just point the way. Supporting Member

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    I usually only carry on me what a need, usually consisting of camera, lens and sometimes spare batteries. Everything else is in my bag in the car.
    If I think I'll need that extra lens, it'll go in a pocket and I'll put on the harness for this larger lens.
    Here's my travel bag with most of the stuff I take.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. PJcam

    PJcam No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thanks for all your replies guys.

    Photography for me, I think is going to be like when I go fishing, I need someone with me to carry my stuff. :biglaugh:

    When I fish (coarse) my wife loads the car for me and always moans, why do you need all this stuff. When I get to the lake, always one where I have someone to help me set up and put away, the bailiff says, have you come for a week PJ. :clap:

    So understandably when I go shooting, (with camera), I will have almost everything with me. Five weeks into the hobby and already got three bags! Why carry so much? Well like fishing I never knew how things would change and always wanted to be able to adjust accordingly. It is no use having the Tamron lens on and a nice robin perches a few feet away. So as the boy scouts motto is, be prepared. Trouble is not being mobile doesn't help and although camera and three lenses are in my main bag, the Tamron lens in a special padded bag just big enough for the lens to fit inside, I do worry it will get knocked. So I am going to see if I can put that in the main bag with camera and maybe have smaller lenses in another bag.

    I did, for the first few weeks, I am now at week five. :biglaugh:

    That's more like me, be prepared, a bit of everything should the situation change and an unexpected opportunity arise. (Except I always have lens hoods on LOL) You forgot your flask and something to eat espresso2x :encouragement:

    Me too zombiesniper, me too.

    Nice set up you got there. I got a net bag on side of my main bag but I am not sure about a lens in it. I guess it is cos everything is new and I have to rely on my wife to carry them and put them in car and on my chair for me, when its your baby I think you look after it more carefully.

    Thanks again all for your replies.
     
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  11. espresso2x

    espresso2x No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Lens shades, good idea. Need a couple of metal ones, on my list. I do use four cameras (two AF, two manual focus), and the two or three manual lenses are all small 'primes'. My scarf is to wipe rain of lenses and to protect the 67mm front of one AF lens.
     
  12. SCraig

    SCraig Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    And sooner or later you're going to realize that 90% of the time you're not using 90% of the crap you're hauling around with you and will then do your wife a favor and start leaving it at home.

    By the time you figure out which bag the lens you need is in, get it out, swap it for the one that's on the camera, recompose, etc. that robin has gotten bored and is in the next county. When those rare opportunities arise, in virtually every instance if it's not already on the camera it's not going to do you a bit of good. If nothing else just sit back and enjoy watching the robin for a moment. You really don't have to photograph everything you see, and can actually just enjoy seeing it.
     
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