How hard is it to develop color film?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Grandpa Ron, Sep 9, 2018.

  1. greybeard

    greybeard Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You have sparked my interest. I have developed tons of B&W film. Everything from 35mm to 4x5. I've used D76, HC110, Microdol, and Rodinal developers with everything from panatomic X to Tri X. Believe me, the best way to load a tank is with a changer bag. You can't lose anything in a changer bag. What is the process for scanning negatives, what is the best equipment for this? (within reason).


     
  2. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    According to my research...scanning negatives is no longer the typical, preferred method. Instead, a number of very serious workers have moved to digitial SLR and slide duplication type setups using modern macro lenses and high-megapixel cameras, very often 24-megapixel APS-C cameras...

    The results I've seen have been good with Nikon and Sony cameras, both crop- and full-frame models. The thing is, it's FAST, and from what multiple authors have said, shooting images of slides and negatives minimized dust and scratches,compared against scanners. Film scanners have stayed with us, and there are 35mm scanners aplenty, as well as flatbed scanners that are better for medium- and large-format negatives.

    I have an old Minolta 35mm scanner. I have an aging EPSON flatbed that I've used for 120 rollfilm and 4x5 inch film. I realllllllllly WISH I had a good copy stage to digitize a few thousand 35mm slides I inherited. Scanning slides is relatively slow.
     
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  3. greybeard

    greybeard Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    OK, I have a 35mm slide copier. It is an el-cheapo that screws into the filter threads of a "normal" lens. I've copied a ton of my slides with it and the results have been descent. If I would go with B&W film I would go with 120 roll film and some like a Mamiya C330 so a flatbed would be best for me.
     
  4. Jamesaz

    Jamesaz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    As with film processing in general, color film requires attention to several details to be precise. That said, you have to mess up really badly to not get something, especially if you're scanning them for output. Go for it. It's only photography.
     
  5. webestang64

    webestang64 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    At my lab we push up to 2 stops and pull 1 stop with our C-41 processor and it comes out fine.
     

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