Is the A-Mount going obsolete?

Discussion in 'Sony Lenses' started by bruced, Apr 5, 2017.

  1. dkmi

    dkmi TPF Noob!

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    Gosh, I've noticed the opposite. It wasn't long ago that the typical price for a Minolta 70-210 f4 was going for $140. Today, they've really dropped. I just checked ebay and they're selling for $50 or less in most cases. Heck, even last summer they were $80. Others have dropped by quite a bit as well. The ones I can't tell are the pro lenses because I wasn't in the market for them a year or two ago. My bet is that those dropped as well. Reason being the proliferation of the e-mount cameras. People love those A7 models and are ditching their a-mounts to get them. I, for one, don't mind that. A proliferation of a-mount cameras and lenses on the market works in my favor so I can upgrade for cheap. Read this guy's ad on CL in my area. The last line backs up my theory. He'll never sell it for the $675 asking price. It's going to be interesting seeing where Sony goes from here.

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  2. petrochemist

    petrochemist TPF junkie!

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    It is how it works. Today's processors fit more transistors into a set area & production costs are decreasing, but a chip four times the size costs more than four times as much to make. Comparing with past generations is totally irrelevant.

    Actually the kit zoom on MFT reaches the same FOV as a 28mm FF. No need for fisheye designs at all for that sort of usage. The longest focal length fisheye for the MFT system is 10mm, quite a significant difference, and there are 7mm rectilinear lenses available.
    If you find the 35mm FOV too wide for indoors there's no need to stick to it a cheap adapted 50mm gives a reasonable portrait FOV on MFT, and of course there are native options as well.
     
  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    As image sensor size increases, fewer image sensors can be made from a single wafer of silicon, which is what larger image sensors cost more to make.
    Basically, a full frame (135 format) image sensor costs 4x as much as a 1/2 the size of full frame, APS-C image sensor.
     
  4. Nintendoeats

    Nintendoeats TPF Noob!

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    Another point is that processors are designed with either redundancies or features from high SKUs. If some of these come out non-functional they can be disabled. On a high level, my hexacore 5930k is actually an octacore 5960x with two cores disabled which vary from chip to chip. This also applies to smaller details of the processor which we don't consider as consumers.

    An image sensor needs to be contiguous, so you can't clip one out and then disable part of it. If a wafer has 100 pixels on it and 10 of them are bad, they might be altogether in a corner or spread out in an x shape. If you want to make 3x3 sensors the first situation is no big deal, while the second renders the entire thing useless. Because processors do not need to be contiguous this is not as significant a problem for them. The same applies to NAND and most other types of chips. To my knowledge image sensors are extremely unusual in this regard.
     

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