Learning is tough

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by CherpeAr, Jan 5, 2019.

  1. Grandpa Ron

    Grandpa Ron No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It is digital so I take as many pictures as necessary.

    But rather than chase my tail, I take my best guess at the settings, shoot the shot. Then switch to "auto" and shoot the same shot. If I like mine better fine, if I like the "auto" better; then I look at photo data an see what the "auto" settings are verse my settings.

    Next I can set my manual setting to the "auto" setting, to see if I get the same picture or if I am overlooking something.

    The bottom line is, I paid to have that personal trainer built into the "auto" setting on my camera; I may as well learn from it.

    The only advantage I see in trying to second guess my "auto" setting is it helps me with my old film cameras which do not have all the whiz bangs and whirly gigs and with my digital camera when I am trying for more shutter speed or depth of field.


     
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  2. CherpeAr

    CherpeAr TPF Noob!

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    Wow! Wonderful information !!
    Thank you so much everyone:) I’m going to be taking lots of notes and trying this out .
     
  3. Fujidave

    Fujidave Blue eyed and Beautiful

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    Some great advice has been given, so hopefully it will help you out. Once I learnt about aperture and shutter speed and using the histogram, I now ( For me only ) totally break all the rules. Reason why is I want to have my style as I shoot a lot of jazz gigs now, and to me if the shot in the viewfinder is sharp and clear with the background blurred then I don`t use the histogram at all a man called Joel Grimes shoots this way too.
     
  4. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Regardless of the shooting mode, understanding the meter, the metering modes, and what the camera is telling you by it goes a LONG way.

    This is one of the basics you should really work at. Without the meter, everything about your exposure is just a guess.

    Then understanding the exposure triangle we take you to the finish line.

    If you don't understand how the meter works, and how to make it work for you, you'll have a hard time mastering exposure. Learning the Sunny 16 chart above, IMHO, doesn't help you whatsoever. I would never shoot at 1/60 [or f/16] for one, and for two, as soon as you adjust the ISO you can blow it out of the window. I concede it does help you understand the relationship between the aperture and shutter speed and how it can affect the final exposure -- but as a useful chart that you can actually use in real life shoot; no. Just learn the exposure triangle -- ISO matters -- regardless of what the technicality nerds will start spewing about it after my post here.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
  5. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    "..technicality nerds.."?

    "..spewing.."?

    Moi?
     
  6. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You can't just walk into TPF, say ISO determines the final exposure, and expect to walk away unscathed.
     
    Last edited: Jan 7, 2019
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  7. CherpeAr

    CherpeAr TPF Noob!

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    Well as far as histogram and metering , uhhh I really don’t pay attention or fully understand those which is probably the problem:aiwebs_016:
     
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  8. Tailgunner

    Tailgunner No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Good info!

    This is exactly what I did starting out and it really helped me a lot! I would take photos under various conditions in auto and see what the camera would select. Then I would switch to manual and take some photos etc.

    Also, try out some of the other modes like Shutter or Aperture priority.
     
  9. ac12

    ac12 Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    One problem is that there are many things that need to be learned close together or in parallel, at least in my thinking.
    Metering is one of the basics; how to meter and what metering modes to use.
    Part of metering is reading and using the histogram to help your metering and correcting your exposure.

    I would look for a good book on basic photography and work through it.
    It will be tedious, because there is a LOT to learn, if you want to.
    Again, take it in small bites, so that you don't choke on the volume of stuff to learn. Example, do a chapter a week, rather than the entire book in a week. And take as much time as you need to learn the subject.

    I personally like the idea of taking a photo class, where you can ask questions of the instructor and get an immediate answer. Books and video do not give you the ability to get immediate answers to your questions.
     
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  10. Grandpa Ron

    Grandpa Ron No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Histograms are your friend and your enemy; when used for obtaining basic exposure and color or black and white balance, they are fairly easy. When you get sucked down the rabbit hole of trying to optimize your photo, you can spend a lot of time tweaking a photo only to look back in a day or so and dump it.

    There is no short cut to becoming a photo artist.
     
  11. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Not using the meter much less looking at it - that's your problem right there! lol

    Learn to 'meter a scene'. Your camera is recording light. You need to get a reading of the amount of light coming in to your camera so you can adjust the camera settings to get proper exposures.

    Many videos etc. 'out there' seem to be done by someone selling books & videos or who are inexperienced or giving inadequate or inaccurate info.; having been a photographer forever I don't often see many that are all that great or that I'd recommend. If possible a class thru a local community art center or anyplace offering adult continuing ed courses would probably be better. I think it can help to be shown how to set and use a camera.

    It'll take time and practice. I still love to go out and take pictures, so you have to like something well enough to spend time on it so you can get good at it.
     
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  12. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    I would start by using the camera in P exposure mode. Set the ISO to 320 or 400. Let the camera meter the scene and set its suggested f/stop and shutter speeds. You can "shift" the exposure with just ONE control wheel. Easy-peasey!
     
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