light meter

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by pocketshaver, Nov 25, 2019.

  1. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 5, 2019
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    15
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Are the Sekonic analog meters a better option for casual use then the 3-500 dollar digital ones?


     
  2. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    44,678
    Likes Received:
    14,168
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What sort of use?
     
  3. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 5, 2019
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    15
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    just normal work. inside and outside.

    Just something that will give me an accurate idea of how to set up a shot. Don't trust my vitomatic light meter anymore
     
  4. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    45,290
    Likes Received:
    17,257
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    You can get a good light meter for a cell phone. I had one called light meter ( imagine that!) For iPhone a few years ago, and it was as accurate as my Minolta flash meter. I compared the two side-by-side on multiple occasions, and it was super accurate and allowed me to actually snap a photo of a scene and to save it along with exposure readings, something that no light meter that I know of can do.

    If all you want to do is get an accurate idea of the correct exposure, then you can get it online at the App Store for free or for as little as $1.99 and have it in three minutes. Provided of course that you have a cell phone. Otherwise spend $150 for a light meter that uses the same technology but which can do nothing else but take light meter readings and of course make you look cool when you wear it around your neck.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  5. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 5, 2019
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    15
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Not to bite the hand offering free advice, but cellphone light meter gadgets not that cheap. Can cost a lot more then the sekonic analog light meters.
     
  6. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    45,290
    Likes Received:
    17,257
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I know you are confused. I am talking about simple apps that do continuous light metering, which are available for free, to $2 to $4 at the most. I am not talking about those little hemispheric domes that convert your cell phone into a flash meter. You asked about a light meter, not about a flash meter. I think it would be good if you were to spend more than two minutes researching what I told you before you reply back next time with an incorrect opinion, okay? You came back with an incorrect opinion in about 2 minutes. Look around,do some research, try and find what I told you about not just do a quick Google and come back at me with another ill- informed bit of snarkiness.
     
  7. tirediron

    tirediron Watch the Birdy! Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    44,678
    Likes Received:
    14,168
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm going to respectfully disagree with Derrel on this. While I accept that experiences do differ, especially when it comes to cheap computer applications, if you want a proper light meter, and plan to use it, then I would suggest buying a proper light meter. If you just want to play around a bit and figure the novelty will wear off quickly, then sure, go for the 'phone option.

    My question on use referred to whether or not you would want to use if for flash exposures. Assuming you don't, then there are likely dozens available for pennies on the dollar on your local used market (Craig's List, et al) assuming you live in or near at least a moderately sized urban centre. One of the best bargains I see are the Luna 6 and Luna Pro meters. In their day, these were top-end pro meters, used by the likes of Dean Collins and others of that calibre. These commonly show up in my area for $75-125 (If you do go this route, be sure to check out which battery the meter uses; some of them used odd size cells, now not commonly available).
     
  8. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    45,290
    Likes Received:
    17,257
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    What does a proper light meter do? A typical iPhone is a much more sophisticated instrument than a Sekonic or Gossen or Minolta standard ambient light meter. As I said the light meter application that they had for the iPhone 4 worked as well as my Minolta meter which is a roughly $500 instrument and it was a free app.

    I have mentioned it several times here before on TPF and every time is has been met withn sarcasm and smart ass disagreements from people who have never even used one.

    Kind of like people who badmouth the iPhone and the Macintosh platform but have never used either. I understand where the naysayer sentiment is coming from... from a point of no experience with the product that you are disparaging . The OP asked about a light meter, not about a flash meter or a combination meter,but the analog Sekonic versus versus digital readout light meters .

    The analog style Sekonic which as you probably know is not a Flash Reader but an incident and reflected meter has its roots in the Eisenhower era.

    I kind of smile when I hear people bad-mouthing light meter application support for handheld computers, which is, surprise! what today's modern cell phone is . This " danger Will Robinson" attitude is kind of like old timers who bad-mouthed the new color TV technology back in the 1960 . Kind of like the Nikon diehards who ridiculed autofocus when it was introduced. Yeah that's right, auto focus was met with ridicule and skepticism when Nikon introduced its autofocus cameras.

    Go ahead, stick with Eisenhower era technology. Buy a tool which is 50 years old in its design and 75 years old or more in its idea. Ignore what the new application can easily do far better than any light meter ever made, which is to take snapshots of a scene and teach you by photographs what the exact lighting condition looks like and what the recommend exposure is.

    Why buy a microwave when there is a perfectly good tea kettle in the house?
     
    Last edited: Nov 25, 2019
  9. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    45,290
    Likes Received:
    17,257
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    The advantage of a handheld light meter is that you get to carry it or wear it on a cord around your neck, and it looks cool, especially if it has a white hemispherical dome for taking incident light readings. In terms of practical utility the advantage of analog display is that it shows you multiple exposure combinations at a glance, which is something that analog display has in advantage over digital.

    This digital versus analog display issue is borne out by the fact that an analog watch allows you to see where you are at in the 12-hour cycle, which is quite a bit different fundamentally from a digital clock, which only shows you one data point.

    Very old reflected light meters such as the Weston Master Series also showed a zone system series of input points, which allowed you to place specific areas of a scene on the zone system scale. Digital meters require you to perform this type of mental gymnastics in your head .

    Unless you pay a lot of money for a professionally reconditioned unit, your chances of finding a working Weston Master Series meter is very slim, however it should be relatively easy to find a Gossen Luna Pro or Sekonic analog type incident meter on eBay.
     
    Last edited: Nov 29, 2019
  10. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2009
    Messages:
    45,290
    Likes Received:
    17,257
    Location:
    USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Oh by the way the iPhone is crap. $89 Android phones are all you will need. If you want a computer for internet use then spend $349 on a Chromebook. It is just as good as the MacBook Pro. A Kia is just as good a car as a Mercedes Benz.
     
    • Funny Funny x 1
  11. pocketshaver

    pocketshaver TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 5, 2019
    Messages:
    214
    Likes Received:
    15
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    KIA as good as Mercedes? bwwaaaaahaaaaahhaaaaaaaaa laughed so hard I almost peed my pants.

    NOTHING kia makes can beat a Mercedes m class that's made in Germany for the german market. sure some quality standards are lowered for cars made in America but that's 99% concerning paint quality. I have made merecedes components, so I knows...

    I DONT like mac or apple products since Intel released the Pentium 90 chip set.
     
  12. smoke665

    smoke665 TPF Supporters Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2016
    Messages:
    11,165
    Likes Received:
    5,231
    Location:
    Alabama
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    @tirediron unfortunately I have to go with @Derrel on the light meter app, with the caveat "Depending on use". I've had the free version of the Light Meter app on my phone for several years now. For what it does, it does it very well. They also have a version that has an analog dial for those purist that can't force themselves to use something digital. :allteeth: I always have my cell phone with me, I can't say the same for my Sekonic's meter.

    I do have to disagree with Derrel on the Chromebook. Bought DW one last year, she hated it!!!! Immediately sold it, and bought her a Dell laptop.
     

Share This Page