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List of lens to use for which type of photos

jermories

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I would like to know from any photography expertise on which are the best recommended lenses to be use for such photos as mention below and the justification reason which such lenses are to be use?

1. Close-up of the harvest of fish
2. Long fishing boats with nice paintings on its sides
3. Wooden houses in the village with stilts in water
4. Children playing
5. Sunset


LENS FOCAL LENGTH APERTURE WEIGHT MINIMUM FOCUS DISTANCE
A 10 - 20MM F4 - 5.6 470 0.24m
B 10 - 20MM F3.5 470 0.24
C 12 - 24MM F4.5 - 5.6 670 0.28
D 20 F1.8 520 0.2
E 50 F1.8 505 0.45
F 85 F1.4 725 0.85
G 105 F2.8 MACRO 725 0.31
H 18 - 105 F3.5 - 5.6 450 0.45 AS
I 18 - 200 F3.5 - 5.6 565 0.45 AS
J 18 - 200 F3.5 - 5.6 565 0.45
K 18 - 200 F3.5 - 5.6 565 1.5 AS
L 18 - 250 F3.5 - 6.3 730 0.45 AS
M 18 - 300 F3.5 - 5.6 1330 0.45 AS
N 18 - 300 F3.5 - 5.6 930 0.45
O 55 - 200 F4 - 5.6 265 1.5 AS
P 70 - 200 F2.8 1530 1.4 AS
 
I'd probably say a 24-70mm zoom lens or one of a similar focal length. If you're on crop sensor a 16-85mm or again similar kinds of numbers.

What you're asking really has no right answer, you can use nearly any lens for any situation as it all depends where you are in relation to the subject and also what kind of photo you want to create. There are conventions but they are only generalist not specific.

Your situation sounds generalist so the focal lengths I mentioned would suit; however a 70-200mm lens would also be suitable in some instances depending on how far you are from the subject; and again what you want.


Sadly sometimes the only answer is to get out there with your camera and find out what works for you.
 
I'd probably say a 24-70mm zoom lens or one of a similar focal length. If you're on crop sensor a 16-85mm or again similar kinds of numbers.

What you're asking really has no right answer, you can use nearly any lens for any situation as it all depends where you are in relation to the subject and also what kind of photo you want to create. There are conventions but they are only generalist not specific.

Your situation sounds generalist so the focal lengths I mentioned would suit; however a 70-200mm lens would also be suitable in some instances depending on how far you are from the subject; and again what you want.


Sadly sometimes the only answer is to get out there with your camera and find out what works for you.

Thanks Overread for your response.

Let's say I want to take a picture on the children playing in the water, drifting between the stilts in plastic tubs and flying kites on the stilts platform. Which lens would you prefer to use?

And take a picture on the silhouette of the stilt houses against the sunset in the sea whcih lens would be prefer?
 
While such a list might be compiled, it will only be filled with generalizations.

You can take a fantastic image of a fishing boat with a fisheye, a 2000mm, and everything in between.
 
Let's say I want to take a picture on the children playing in the water, drifting between the stilts in plastic tubs and flying kites on the stilts platform. Which lens would you prefer to use?
You did not list the 24-70, but speaking for myself I agree with Overread and that is the lens I would want.
 
jermories its really hard to say, what might be best for you if you don't currently have a camera is to consider one of the more affordable 18-200mm lenses. Whilst they are not outstanding performers they are affordable and let you do everything all in one lens very easily. You can use the rough focal length markings on the barrel of the lens to get a feel for different focal lengths, an idea of what works for you and which could then be used to help guide a more expensive lens purchase in the future.

Note on most zoom lenses the ends of the zoom range (long and short end) tend to be accurate, but the points in the middle are a rough guide only so won't be perfect.
 
Do you have any lens at the moment? It's generally best to start out with the camera manufacturer's suggested “kit” lens—that way you can at least get to know the different focal lengths, learn what they do to the image by experience, and find out what works best for whichever task you throw at it.

It’s important to know that the decision is very personal—what one swears by, you may find unusable or not very pleasing. For example, I really like shooting landscape images with a telephoto lens. I don’t do it very often, and I don’t always get the results I imagine in my head, but when it comes together, I tend to prefer it over a wide-angle view of the same landscape. I know many photographers use wide-angle lenses for landscapes, and that is what I read is necessary, so had I not experimented with it myself, it’s possible I would have only resorted to the familiar, and frankly often boring.
 
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It's not a good thing trying to make a list as you would never remember it.
 
Lens choice is really situational oriented as opposed to subject oriented.
Those questions could have answers.
For instance, your question "3. Wooden houses in the village with stilts in water" could be
3. Wooden houses in the village with stilts in water from across the bay or from a boat 10meters away.? or Late at night with the background blurred.
 
In the USA we have an old folk saying: "There is more than one way to skin a cat." There is more than one way to photgraph a fishing boat, or houses, or anything.

You want realism and natural, true size relationships? The use a lens focal length that is with the normal lens length range, and shoot at normal distances of 10 feet or more. You want distorted, unnatural size relationships and distorted background renderings? If so, then use ultra-wide-angle lenses or very long telephopto lenses. The 10-20mm zoom lens and the 70-200mm zoom lens are at exact OPPOSITE ends of the common lens spectrum. These two common zoom lens types tend to create images that are the exact, polar opposite of what the other lens creates.
 

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