Looking for some advice for expanding my glass

Discussion in 'Nikon Accessories' started by rhyno214, May 11, 2016.

  1. robbins.photo

    robbins.photo Yup, It's The Zoo Guy Supporting Member

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    Might want to take a peek at a Tamron 28-75mm 2.8. You can get the older versions without the built in focus motors pretty cheap, and it's a great lens - plus you can hang onto it when you do upgrade to FX since it is an FX lens.


     
  2. MartinCrabtree

    MartinCrabtree No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    That does explain my penchant for older manual focus Nikon glass. Even when shooting digital. The AF-S stuff will focus sharp-tack sharp but lifeless and color renditions aren't pleasing to my eye. I thought it was just me but the article did clear some of what I thought I saw up. Cool-now it's back to ebay for more vintage bargains. :D
     
  3. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Fixed focal length lenses produce higher contrast than zooms because the zooms have more elements and therefore more glass surfaces that reflect some of the light. Old doesn't mean soft by any means with fixed lenses. Most of the better ones compete just fine with the fixed lenses made today and are often more ruggedly built. Zoom lenses prior to the advent of computer aided design can be softer than modern ones.
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Good on your decision to go medium format.

    If you ever think back to 35mm or dSLR, remember "jack of all trades, master of none."
    Example, an 80-200 is in theory a nice portrait lens. BUT it is NOT a light lens. My arm would HURT after shooting with it all day. I would rather select a smaller and lighter zoom, or primes that match the shooting requirement.
    OK, so I don't work out at the gym every day.
     
  5. OldManJim

    OldManJim No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have some old MF and enlarger lenses from the 1930s that perform as well as the more modern lenses. I think in the old days, lens quality was tested by actually evaluating photos, not test charts. Probably the percentage of "good" lenses was lower than today but those that made it through the testing process to acceptance, were pretty darn good. Think about it, before there were algorithms, someone had to actually make a good lens. The algorithms were created using measurements from those "good" lenses. So, is a copy better than the original? Not in most things.
     

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