Motion panning

Sirashley

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I haven't posted here in ages, but I've recently upgraded from my dinosaur D200 to a D7200... I figured I'd try my hand at motion panning since I haven't done that in a while either, totally forgot how tough that was. One thing I couldn't figure out was how to get a wider aperture while keeping the shutter speed down, even with the ISO down to 100... Anyway, I was able to get a couple of decent shots at f/13 and f/11 but I'd love to figure that out how I could shoot at f/5.6 and get the shutter speed down. I've seen pro automobile shots where they're panning at f/4, whereas this R.C. boat was only 27 inches long, it's left me wondering if the size of the subject can affect the need for a wide aperture? and if so, how then do you get the shutter speed when you're already at ISO 100?

f/13
FIN-DSC_0406_tonemapped-2-L.jpg


f/11
FIN-DSC_0310-L.jpg
 

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As ac12 states, ND filters are probably your only option. They act like sunglasses for your camera and reduce the amount of light passing your lens. To counteract that, you can then open your aperture. ND filters are available in different densities and filter sizes. I bought the ones that fit the diameter of my largest lens and bought step down rings to make them fit my other lenses rather than buying a set of filters for each lens diameter.
 

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A polarizing filter is another option, and could,potentially, improve the photos. It will cut some of the light down, allowing you to move from f/11 to around f/5.6 or thereabouts.

Be aware that, at times, that large, broad, diffuse highlight on top of the water's surface, is important; it's best not to "polarize away" the highlight that provides a depth/dimensional clue/cue to the brain.

If your camera offers what Nikon calls a "Low-" ISO option, Like Low-1, or Low-2, Low-3, that will give the effect of a lower-than-base ISO value, which is another way to get a wider f/stop, or a slower shutter speed.
 

DSP121

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Wooh!
Amazing clicks... Nice work :)
 
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Sirashley

Sirashley

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Hey thanks guys, thats some great info... I'm gonna have to check for the low Iso option in my camera, I didn't even know that feature existed...

Also gonna have to grab a few ND filters for sure, sounds like that may be what I'm looking for... Thanks again!
 

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Just be aware that Low-ISO and High-ISO are done with software, not electronic amplification, and have less dynamic range than base ISO settings.
 

Braineack

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great shots. like the others said, a CPL or 2-stop ND can help out here.
 

petrochemist

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I don't think DOF matters so much with panning. the background gets blurred by the movement so doesn't distract as much even when it's within the focused range.

When I do panning shots (mainly with motorsports) I typically just select shutter priority & base ISO (or slightly higher if light demands it) I've never tried an ND for panning. Perhaps if I lived somewhere with more sunshine than the UK it might be needed...
 

ac12

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When I do panning shots (mainly with motorsports) I typically just select shutter priority & base ISO (or slightly higher if light demands it) I've never tried an ND for panning. Perhaps if I lived somewhere with more sunshine than the UK it might be needed...

You have a natural ND filter ;)

I would have loved that overcast a couple weeks ago when I was shooting a graduation under bright sun, and the resulting harsh shadows. :(
 

petrochemist

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When I do panning shots (mainly with motorsports) I typically just select shutter priority & base ISO (or slightly higher if light demands it) I've never tried an ND for panning. Perhaps if I lived somewhere with more sunshine than the UK it might be needed...

You have a natural ND filter ;)

I would have loved that overcast a couple weeks ago when I was shooting a graduation under bright sun, and the resulting harsh shadows. :(

I think our overcast might often be a bit too much, a degree of shadows are preferable IMO. Perhaps if we sent you have our cloud we'd both have improved lighting :biggrin-93:

Despite my moaning the lighting this evening was fantastic, with golden hour sunshine of set by dark black clouds. I should have made time for getting out with the camera as soon as I finished the kids taxi service!
 

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Just be aware that Low-ISO and High-ISO are done with software, not electronic amplification, and have less dynamic range than base ISO settings.

Be aware also that the loss of dynamic range is often no big deal, if it is even noticeable. If you overexpose, the loss of effective dynamic range can be an issue, but my experience is that it's sometimes very much worth it to get the right shutter speed and the right f-stop for the shot, even if the camera's artificially lowered ISO value causes a slightly narrowed dynamic range. I have on multiple occasions, used the Low-ISO setting on one of Nikon's worst-ever sensors, the one in the D2x, and it's been okay. At times, getting the right,slow shutter speed becomes the most-important exposure parameter; blurring often demands pretty slow speeds, which can be tricky to get during bright-light conditions.
 

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