My herbs have sprouted!!

JustJazzie

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I finally decided to try my hand at window herbs this year, and I am delighted that almost all of them have sprouted already! Ive got a dozen pots going of 5 different herbs, and my son started one of his own. Never having sprouted anything from seed before (in my adult life) its been pretty exciting to see new ones popping up. We are still waiting on the Dill sprouts!

(disclaimer, these photos were taken on a "just-for-fun" basis. no professionals were consulted before pressing the shutter button on these frames, view with caution)


On a side note, my Chalanchoe is in sorry shape. Tips to save her are appreciated!
DSC_5641.jpg DSC_5642.jpg DSC_5645.jpg DSC_5647.jpg
 
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The risk is in the transplantation if they get "leggy".
They are all in 6 inch terra cotta pots, as far as I read they could just live there, no?
They can live in those pots for quite a while, but if the light is dim (inside light) they get tall and thin, (leggy) which then makes them tend to bend way down and possibly kink the stem. They need full sunlight as soon as you can give it to them. If the ground is workable, you can put them out and cover them at night or anytime the temps go low.
 
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JustJazzie

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The risk is in the transplantation if they get "leggy".
They are all in 6 inch terra cotta pots, as far as I read they could just live there, no?
They can live in those pots for quite a while, but if the light is dim (inside light) they get tall and thin, (leggy) which then makes them tend to bend way down and possibly kink the stem. They need full sunlight as soon as you can give it to them. If the ground is workable, you can put them out and cover them at night or anytime the temps go low.
Oh, I dont think I will have to worry about that! All the windows in my front room are southern facing. Also, I am lucky enough to live on top of a mountain, so not even the tree tops block the sunshine from pouring in. Its practically a green house in here.
 

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Very cool! And your disclaimer about the pictures is hilarious.
 

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I first sprouted seeds way back in 1968 - cannabis sativa seeds.
I sprouted them between layers of damp paper towels.

I'm getting ready to start green onions, celery, and tomatoes in addition to herbs. I use cilantro - a lot - so cilantro will be one of my main crops.
I start my green onions and celery from cutting the bottoms off of green onions and celery I buy at the grocery store.
I buy small tomato plants from the local nursery and grow the tomatoes in upside down hanging planters.
 
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JustJazzie

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I first sprouted seeds way back in 1968 - cannabis sativa seeds.
I sprouted them between layers of damp paper towels.

I'm getting ready to start green onions, celery, and tomatoes in addition to herbs. I use cilantro - a lot - so cilantro will be one of my main crops.
I start my green onions and celery from cutting the bottoms off of green onions and celery I buy at the grocery store.
I buy small tomato plants from the local nursery and grow the tomatoes in upside down hanging planters.
We soaked these overnight first as well!
The Blue Dream (last photo) I have going is a 50/50, indica/sativa hybrid. I only had one of those, so I was pleasantly surprised to see that it sprouted!

I thought about starting cilantro, because we use so much but ultimately decided we used too much for me to keep up with! And, the store ALWAYS has cilantro and parsley. Basil is hit and miss. Im pretty sure I can keep up with our thyme consumption, and dill is so pretty and soft! I never cook with sage, so I have no idea why I chose it. :giggle: But I am sure I will find something to do with it.

I LOVE LOVE LOVE tomatoes. We were going to start those this year as well, but planning a long vacation and I wont be here to care for/eat them. Next year though, I hope to. I love the hanging idea! I will have to look into it more.

Someday well have a full vegetable garden, but we need to get the area fenced off from the deer, and start working on the soil/compost. So until then, container gardening it is!!
 

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I start my green onions and celery from cutting the bottoms off of green onions and celery I buy at the grocery store.
This reminds me of something called "winter onions". My neighbor grew them and offered me some. OMG! Those were the strongest onions I have ever tasted! Way more pungent than regular onions, and I never asked him for more.
 

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I will tell you all now that you DO NOT WANT winter onions.

In case you don't know what they are, they are something like regular scallions, in that they are sort of narrow and white on the bottom, green on top, but they "overwinter" starting out as the narrow scallion type onion, but then they re-green in the spring and get just a bit larger, and WAY more strong.
 
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JustJazzie

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I will tell you all now that you DO NOT WANT winter onions.

In case you don't know what they are, they are something like regular scallions, in that they are sort of narrow and white on the bottom, green on top, but they "overwinter" starting out as the narrow scallion type onion, but then they re-green in the spring and get just a bit larger, and WAY more strong.
Ill stay away! Im not a big onion fan. I don't mind it pureed into a sauce, or chopped finely into a dish, but if onion is a prominent flavor- no thank you!
 

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