Need comments on open shade photo

k.udhay

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I recently posted this in thephotoforum:
How to get No-shadow, No-highlight smooth lighting outdoor

And got these opinions from forum members:
1. Subjects to be placed in open shade
2. Right times are early morning and evening when clouds diffuse the light
3. Metering to be done for subject - Not matrix

Keeping all these in mind, I tried shooting a friend. I also positioned him to get natural back light and some bokeh. Here is the raw file:
DSC_0565.NEF

Do I always get haze like this? - I could get rid of this by moving my black slider in photoshop - However, would like to know if there is a way eliminating this at camera level.

I am happy with the exposure I got in the subject's face. Still, I feel there is something missing. I am desperate to take this to the next level. Hence request your comments pl.

Camera settings for the attached pic.: -
Nikon D3200 (Cropped sensor DSLR)
f/1.8
1/160 second
ISO 200
50 mm prime lens
No light other than natural.
 

dxqcanada

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Looks like internal flare causing the haze, because of the direct sunlight hitting the lens elements ... or as tirediron mentioned something in or on the lens ... or the atmosphere is really that hazy in India.
 

Designer

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And got these opinions from forum members:
1. Subjects to be placed in open shade
2. Right times are early morning and evening when clouds diffuse the light
3. Metering to be done for subject - Not matrix
As I recall, your question was how the photographer got that look. I would not recommend open shade in all cases. True, the harmful shadows will be far less noticeable, but you still need to learn to manipulate light.

The reason for early morning and evening was not for the presence of clouds, but for a better angle of the sun. Midday sunlight is very difficult unless you add flash. Still difficult, and most photographers simply avoid midday sunlight altogether.
 

benhasajeep

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I think it's more stray light in your lens than haze. I have several suggestions below.

If you have a UV filter, sky filter, or clear lens protector on your lens. Take it off!

Get the lens hood made for your lens and put it on!

Get a good multi-coated circular polarizer (do not get a cheap one!) make sure it's a quality multi-coated filter! Hoya, B&W to name a few good ones. You would think get a haze filter. But get a C-Pol instead. It works on eliminating some haze and good for other situations as well (get circular polarizer, not linear which is cheaper). The Circular polarizer will give you nice dark blue skies, help with some haze in the background, and has other uses for controlling reflections and more. Very good filter to have!!

Buy an inexpensive light stand (or even make a stand) and get a reflector. Get some clamps so that you can attach the reflector to the stand. Since I work alone most of the time. I use a light stand, and have a stand grip head, and 2 double grip heads. Along with 3, boom arms with clips. This way I can aim and have a reflector held by a stand. The double grip heads go on the lower legs of the stand (each with a boom arm). That way I can 3-point the reflector to the angles I want. The the stand grip head and a boom arm at the top as well. I carry a medium sandbag in case it's a little breezy. Reflectors make good sails.

You want the back light for the subject to get the look you want. But need some fill light from the front side to brighten up your subject some. A multi-coated filter will help lower the chances of light bouncing around between the elements of the lens. A hood will help keep stray light out of the lens which I believe what your are seeing.
 

KmH

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Your subject is not in open shade, he is back lit and as mentioned the 'haze' is direct sunlight reflecting on internal lens element surfaces where there are air gaps between lens element groups - also known as 'lens flare'.
 
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