Ring flash diffuser for MPE65 mm

Discussion in 'Macro Photography' started by davholla, Dec 1, 2019.

  1. davholla

    davholla No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Sadly my ring flash that I use with my Canon MPE65 mm has died. I do have a twin flash but I really find it gets in the way and hate using it.

    Any ideas on how to either

    a) create a new diffuser for a new ring flash?

    b) any advice for using the twin flash (it is the Yongnou Y24-ex flash. I did buy custom diffusers for it - and they are useless - really get in the way. The seller was helpful but I really hate them - others might have a different experience).


     
  2. davholla

    davholla No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  3. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I've not used a ringflash with the MPE 65mm. The problem with most diffusers is that to diffuse you have to increase the light source size relative to the subject. With most of the twinflash diffusers they come with (or require) small raising sections to be added between the ring mount and the flash head so that you can fit the diffuser (typically a small softbox) onto the flash head without it getting in the way of the lens and subject.

    With a ringflash you can't do that because the ring is mounted direct to the lens itself. So any enlargement would have to happen right at the front as well - with the MPE there just isn't that much space to work with before you're getting in the way of your subject.

    The best you might get is cross polarizing, something that I read about a long while back but never got to try. You basically put a polarizing filter on the lens (circular one works best as you can rotate it). Then you put a polarizing paper infront of the flash light as well. You then turn the circular polarizer to help block out some of the reflective light from the flash light. I've heard it works well on reflections and shiny surfaces (bugs are quite shiny). But like I said, I've never got around to testing this one.
     
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  4. K9Kirk

    K9Kirk Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Is this what you were looking for? Sorry if it doesn't help.

     
  5. waday

    waday Do one thing every day that scares you Supporting Member

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    I’d very highly recommend looking up Kurt (orionmystery) G on Flickr. He used to be on here as @orionmystery , and definitely look at some of his threads. I believe he discussed his setup and what he uses with some really good tips. Seriously amazing work.

    ETA: found his rig setup on his website, but I didn’t realize it’s already 10 years old...
    Up Close with Nature: My Macro Rig - Then and Now
     
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