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So....this is my cat.

xDarek

No longer a newbie, moving up!
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I was at my grandparents house and I saw this :)))
 

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These are better than the pictures in your other cat thread. Things that improved these pictures:
-the subject is more isolated
-you shot them from closer to the cat's level. Generally for animals or children, you want to get low so you can shoot them more straight-on.

Things to continue to work on:
-decide exactly what you want in the frame and what is not necessary. In these, it looks like there is another animal behind the cat (my guess is a dog? The color of the fur suggests a Labrador?) It's distracting. You could change the perspective (move so that you are looking at the cat from a different angle) or you could crop more closely.
-be careful of obstructions. That twig in front of the cat can work if the cat is in the process of sniffing it or rubbing against it, but otherwise, it's just blocking her face. Again, a different perspective can work here.

Overall, the pictures still need work, but you've already shown improvement :)
 
These are better than the pictures in your other cat thread. Things that improved these pictures:
-the subject is more isolated
-you shot them from closer to the cat's level. Generally for animals or children, you want to get low so you can shoot them more straight-on.

Things to continue to work on:
-decide exactly what you want in the frame and what is not necessary. In these, it looks like there is another animal behind the cat (my guess is a dog? The color of the fur suggests a Labrador?) It's distracting. You could change the perspective (move so that you are looking at the cat from a different angle) or you could crop more closely.
-be careful of obstructions. That twig in front of the cat can work if the cat is in the process of sniffing it or rubbing against it, but otherwise, it's just blocking her face. Again, a different perspective can work here.

Overall, the pictures still need work, but you've already shown improvement :)
Thank you!! That is my dog and he was playing with my cat's tail.I tried to avoid him but I couldn't , I will try to crop it.Thank you again for your feedback.:bouncingsmileys:
 
I agree with everything limr mentioned in her C&C above, except that the doggy fur makes me think Irish Setter more than Labrador... ;-)

I did not see your other cat thread, so I can't compare these images against the ones in the other post you made, but I will point out that the small twig or stick that Leonore mentioned is the type of thing that can be cloned out fairly easily, especially with a clean background like snow...eliminating the small distractions is one of the key concepts that one needs to keep in mind in this type of uncontrolled, fluid shooting situation. For example, let's say you are photographing a small child, or a pet...you've gotten yourself into a crouching position, have a rather long focal length lens, and have the exposure nailed--so, the important concern becomes, basically, looking through the viewfinder and then diligently analyzing the viewfinder image, looking for problem items: sticks, cluttery backgrounds, toys laying about, the feet of other people intruding into the picture area, junk that clutters the ground or floor (sprinkler heads, soda cans, whatever).

The ability to look into the viewfinder, and to almost ignore the subject while focusing in on, and eliminating unwanted, extraneous "stuff" is one of the first things the beginning photographer needs to become good at; deliberately forcing yourself to LOOK at the frame edges, and indeed the entire image area, by deliberately scanning the frame in a clockwise,or counterclockwise direction is an exercise that the famous David Vestal used to teach his students and his magazine readers. I learned about that method from one of his articles back in 1975, when I was just getting into photography. Working on learning how to eliminate distracting elements I would say, was in retrospect, the single most-valuable photography lesson I learned in that decade.

In this case, I would have snapped that twig off, right at ground level, then resumed shooting. There is no rule against "prepping the scene".
 
I agree with everything limr mentioned in her C&C above, except that the doggy fur makes me think Irish Setter more than Labrador... ;-)

I did not see your other cat thread, so I can't compare these images against the ones in the other post you made, but I will point out that the small twig or stick that Leonore mentioned is the type of thing that can be cloned out fairly easily, especially with a clean background like snow...eliminating the small distractions is one of the key concepts that one needs to keep in mind in this type of uncontrolled, fluid shooting situation. For example, let's say you are photographing a small child, or a pet...you've gotten yourself into a crouching position, have a rather long focal length lens, and have the exposure nailed--so, the important concern becomes, basically, looking through the viewfinder and then diligently analyzing the viewfinder image, looking for problem items: sticks, cluttery backgrounds, toys laying about, the feet of other people intruding into the picture area, junk that clutters the ground or floor (sprinkler heads, soda cans, whatever).

The ability to look into the viewfinder, and to almost ignore the subject while focusing in on, and eliminating unwanted, extraneous "stuff" is one of the first things the beginning photographer needs to become good at; deliberately forcing yourself to LOOK at the frame edges, and indeed the entire image area, by deliberately scanning the frame in a clockwise,or counterclockwise direction is an exercise that the famous David Vestal used to teach his students and his magazine readers. I learned about that method from one of his articles back in 1975, when I was just getting into photography. Working on learning how to eliminate distracting elements I would say, was in retrospect, the single most-valuable photography lesson I learned in that decade.

In this case, I would have snapped that twig off, right at ground level, then resumed shooting. There is no rule against "prepping the scene".
Thank you Derrel! This really helps me a lot.I will be more carreful with these details.I know that stick is in front of my cat and is distracting the viwer from the actual subject.I will try to improve this.I will try to make a photo cleaner, without unwanted details.My another topic is in the Nature&Wildlife section, if you want to compare....Thank you again for your feedback.This helps me a lot.
 
I agree with everything limr mentioned in her C&C above, except that the doggy fur makes me think Irish Setter more than Labrador... ;-)

I did not see your other cat thread, so I can't compare these images against the ones in the other post you made, but I will point out that the small twig or stick that Leonore mentioned is the type of thing that can be cloned out fairly easily, especially with a clean background like snow...
I am inexperienced and ham-handed, but still was able to manage this:
cat.jpg
 
I agree with everything limr mentioned in her C&C above, except that the doggy fur makes me think Irish Setter more than Labrador... ;-)

I did not see your other cat thread, so I can't compare these images against the ones in the other post you made, but I will point out that the small twig or stick that Leonore mentioned is the type of thing that can be cloned out fairly easily, especially with a clean background like snow...
I am inexperienced and ham-handed, but still was able to manage this:View attachment 114140
Nice.I didn't know that I could post photos that are edited in Ps.Anyway nice edit and thank you.
 
A good, clean cloning job there Peeb!
 
I'm not a pro at stamp tool, so what do you think?
 

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