The 1.4x Teleconverter Doesn't Cut It!

Discussion in 'Nature & Wildlife' started by Flying Panda, Feb 12, 2020.

  1. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    Yes, and if you can hold both that's perfect. However in wildlife photos it's generally considered better to expose for the subject and let the background do what it wants if it's a choice between them.


     
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  2. K9Kirk

    K9Kirk Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Someone told me recently on another forum that when it's bright out to expose for the light and in post edit to brink up the light in the shadows (on the subject) to more closely match the surrounding light. I tried it on one pic and it seemed to help. Can't say it was perfect, though. Just putting that out there for anyone interested in a possible solution to the problem.
     
  3. weepete

    weepete TPF Supporters Supporting Member

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    As a rule of thumb it's not a bad one, generally speaking with digital it's better to expose for the highlights and do shadow recovery in post. But with photography as in life there's an exception to every rule and generally speaking, the subject in wildlife photography is so intrinsic to the shot that it's often better to get best quality on the subject and minor deficencies elswhere can be forgiven.
     
  4. Space Face

    Space Face TPF Noob!

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    I agree with the above.

    I always expose for the subject, particularly for birds and shoot wide open almost all of the time. The general rule too is your shutter speed needs to be at least equal if not greater than your focal length ie if you are at 800mm then the SS should be at least 1/800. I also use the lowest ISO I can get away with to give me the SS I desire which I find is around 1/1000 - 1/1200 for the lenses detailed below.

    This can vary depending on how steady your hand is, how good your stabilization (if your lens has any) and whether you are using a tripod/monopod but it's a good generalisation to consider.

    I have a Canon 500mm f/4L, the Sigma 800mm f/5.6 and Sigma 150 -600C and the slightest twitch at my end results in a lot of camera/lens shake at the fat end and subsequently almost unusable IQ.

    I don't have any of the newer TC's but have a Canon x1.4 MK1 and never use it due to the loss of IQ.
     

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