The proof is in the picking.....Photo editing.

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Sportsax, Feb 23, 2018.

  1. Sportsax

    Sportsax TPF Noob!

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    I think I have dust in the lens with a combination of old expired film. Could you fix this beginners photo with photo editing software and post back so I can see.

    Gate's Open #2

    I appreciate it. It's just an old Mamiya DTl 1000 with Kodak T-Max 100. I took the photo and then took it to Walmart for "send out" processing.

    My curiosity revolves around the idea about analog versus digital realm. I took the photo then took it to Walmart 17 days ago for developing. I specified on the envelop to send me negatives back....they did. I scanned the negative on an inexpensive Epson V550 at 1200 dpi and 48bit. No processing otherwise.

    Just trying to learn the ropes here in my own way.

    Thank You.


     
  2. Light Guru

    Light Guru Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Looks more like dust on the film.

    And Im going to be SUPPER blunt if your not going to learn yo touch up dust spots YOURSELF then don't shoot film. Even if you shoot digital this is something you should know how to do.

    What photo software do you have maybe we can point you to a tutorial to learn.

    And finally 17 days is ridiculous. Half the fun of shooting film is developing it yourself.
     
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  3. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Definitely dust on the film during the scan. What idea about analog versus digital has you curious? Here's your photo:

    Joe

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Sportsax

    Sportsax TPF Noob!

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    Thanks. BTW....Light Guru, I will learn. I posted here for that purpose. I figured it could be easy to fix dust spots. I did it just to rile you up. I guess. Best question was from, Ysarex.

    If I want to be a great photographer (starting out), would it be better that I save all my money plus sell my old treasured Harley Davidson Sportster 1200 to buy the new stuff or just get an old camera and finally learn how to develop better in house to save money.

    I used to be a printer in Dallas. Electromagnetic plate making.....full color printing with precision three runs through with "Process Blue", Yellow and Magenta.

    No Disrespect

    Picnic Time
     
  5. Ysarex

    Ysarex Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    You can keep the Harley. The new stuff doesn't cost that much. Once you make the initial hardware purchase the new stuff cost per pic drops to nearly zero whereas the on-going cost for film will quickly catch up with the new stuff hardware cost and then exceed it. You want to learn? Take lots of pictures.

    https://www.amazon.com/Nikon-D3400-...F8&qid=1519474128&sr=1-5&keywords=Nikon d3400

    Joe

     
  6. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If you're considering the purchase of new (used) film gear, you might be pleasantly surprised at the prices and availability. Hardly anyone is interested in film these days, consequently film cameras and darkroom stuff is going for peanuts. Before you panic at the presumed cost, take a few days and gather more information. You can find top quality photographic gear at cents on the dollar, and depending on diligent you are, you may even find that proverbial diamond in the rough. Keep looking.

    Some years ago I had multiple boxes of old film cameras and darkroom stuff that I put out at my garage sale. I practically gave it away. Some luck going along with your diligence can't hurt.

    Naturally, you will have to purchase new film, darkroom chemistry, and paper, but you would have that expense regardless of what equipment you use.

    Good luck hunting, and keep us posted.
     
  7. dennybeall

    dennybeall No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    IMHO - (notice I said My Opinion)
    Unless you want to get high on the smell of developer and fixer it's senseless to shoot film. With the modern digital cameras you can do any aspect of photography and produce photos as well or better than film.
     
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  8. vintagesnaps

    vintagesnaps Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It looks like dust on the negatives from processing, but you could check and dust/wipe the inside back of the camera. It wouldn't be due to expired film I don't think. It wouldn't be due to dust in the lens, dust would have to get on the film when it's out of the cartridge (which would be as it advances thru the camera maybe, never heard of that happening, but more likely during processing/drying). Look at your negatives (I'm guessing you don't have a light box), you could hold them up to a lamp shade. Maybe you'll need to get the dust off the negs and do a rescan.

    I've used a rocket 'blaster'/blower, you squeeze the bulb and it just uses air to blow off dust. Be gentle especially with the emulsion side. I've also used a (had to look it up because I couldn't think of the name) Beseler dust gun. Practice first, you spritz a short burst using a quick wrist movement along the strip of negatives. There are other products, try a camera store like Adorama or B&H, but you may not need that if a rocket blower gets the dust off.

    I usually clean the scanner anytime before I'm going to use it. I use a cleaner that is made for that purpose, and squirt some on a microfiber cloth then wipe the scanner. I let it air dry before using it.

    You might want to look at options for processing. Discount and drug stores in my area have never been the best. Labs seem to offer options - developing only, scan to a CD or online, proof sheets, prints, etc.

    Do what works for you. I used to use a shared darkroom at a local university (the building since got remodeled) and since my time there was limited I'd get B&W film developed so I could look at the negatives at home first. I've always gotten color film developed by a lab, and now send out B&W too. I'd like to have a darkroom set up at home because I like to print (when that'll happen remains to be seen).

    Next time you might want to post in the Film section of the forum so you might get more responses from people who shoot film.
     

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