what the f (stop)?!

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by phillipkane, Jan 27, 2019.

  1. Tim Tucker 2

    Tim Tucker 2 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Aye, there is no doubt that exposure in digital is easier and the automation is better.

    But if you had a Hassy I would thoroughly recommend it's taken out to play occasionally. ;);););)


     
  2. phillipkane

    phillipkane TPF Noob!

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    the Hasselblad is the only camera I have really, apart from the Lomo LC-A+ 35mm... I f’d up and shot the Acros 100 at 400 so I will need to tell the lab to push it two stops... this film thing is such a huge pain, wish my D810 hadn’t been stolen :/
     
  3. greybeard

    greybeard Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    In a high contrast B&W situation, I would over expose but then cut back the developing time in the tank. That way you will have your details in the shadows but do not block the highlights. Ansel Adams had a system called the "zone system" where he took 7 or 8 readings and then had a development time that would keep all the exposure zones between total black and total white. He did it with a Weston meter and a view camera. One piece of film at a time.
     
  4. 480sparky

    480sparky Chief Free Electron Relocator Supporting Member

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    Also called 'pulling' the film.
     
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  5. unpopular

    unpopular Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Expose for the shadows, develop for the highlights. So to get detail in the sky density, you'll need to process the film less.

    If you're not processing the film yourself most pro labs can custom process at N-2. This should compensate for the +2 over exposure.

    If you're processing the film, the exact timing for can be estimated with a generic characteristic curve, though this is pretty variable. Obviously you could read The Negative by Adams, buy a crusty densotometer from ebay, and do all the measurements yourself. But I don't think that's entirely necessary and with time you'll appreciate how your film and developer performs. Shooting large format you can develop by inspection, too - but I've never had the balls to try this.

    Other than that, you could try reduction.
     

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