Witch lens (for Nikon DX) would you get?

Discussion in 'Nikon Lenses' started by stk, Feb 27, 2018.

  1. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    16,704
    Likes Received:
    4,204
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I agree; "full frame".

    You can get a (probably used) body, and just pick away at the lenses as you get more money.

    If you do end up with a "full frame" body, a 100 or 105 will be about the minimum focal length for portraiture, probably more like 135 or 180 would be my recommendation. There are many excellent lenses in those focal lengths, and it looks like you've already got the wide end covered.


     
  2. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    Messages:
    5,612
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Cork Ireland
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  3. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    293
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    For a GP lens, I went with the 18-140 f/3.5-5.6.
    It has its limitations (slow, bit heavy) but it has given me better than expected service.
    I change lenses very infrequently now. That lens meets at least 80% of my shooting needs.

    Another good GP lens is the 16-80 f/2.8-4.
    The 2 big differences are:
    1) It is a FASTER lens than the 18-140. So better for lower light.
    2) The zoom range is smaller, but wider. It has a wider short end than the 18-140. If you are indoors or shoot wide, that 2mm can make a difference. But it is significantly shorter on the long end.
    Except for field sports, the 80mm end is good enough for most things. And you do have your 70-300 to reach out further.

    I have always liked the convenience of a GP zoom, starting from the old 43-86.
    • When I shot slides, what I shot was what was projected. So in camera cropping was critical. Hence the short zoom over a 50mm prime.
    • Carrying less lenses, makes for a lighter kit.
      • This becomes important when that kit is on your shoulder every day for 2-3 weeks (on vacation). It is no fun when you are so worn out that you don't want to shoot. Been there, done that.
      • As I get older, the weight that I can carry for a significant length of time, goes down. IOW, today I cannot carry what I used to easily carry 25 years ago.
    Today my travel kit would be 2 lenses; the 18-140 + 35 f/1.8 (for low light stuff).
    That is a lot less bulky and lighter than the 4 lenses I carried with my film camera, when I was younger.

    A Sigma 150-600 or Nikon 200-500 is a nice lens to have, if you shoot far. But personally, I do not shoot long, enough to justify the cost of the $1,400 Nikon 200-500 lens. Instead, I went with a manual focus 500mm for 10% of the cost of the Nikon zoom. The manual 500 was "good enough."
    If I shot birds, or wind surfing, or similar distant subjects, a LOT, then the picture is different, and the need for the 200-500 lens goes up.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  4. Frank F.

    Frank F. engineering art Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2016
    Messages:
    1,982
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Location:
    Bonn
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Nikkor 1.8/85G --- terrific lens on FX and DX, I use it on my D500 & D850 all the time. Absolutely superb!

    Lens review: The Nikon AF-S 85/1.8 G

     
  5. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Jun 17, 2013
    Messages:
    11,869
    Likes Received:
    4,740
    Location:
    NoVA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  6. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    16,704
    Likes Received:
    4,204
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Ah.. Been practicing your Japanese, I see.
     
  7. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2017
    Messages:
    901
    Likes Received:
    293
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Uh, this is in his summary:

    quote
    “I was able to get nearly identical results from both camera setups,” Ortiz tells PetaPixel. “The message of the video is that there isn’t much difference between the photos coming from both types of cameras and other factors play a bigger role!”
    end quote

    So his summary is that it does not make a difference.

    However, gear does make a difference. His crop lens was a $1,000 prime lens, not a $200 kit lens.
    Compare an inexpensive $400 crop kit to a high end $6,000 FF kit and you likely have a visible difference. But is that a fair/valid comparison?
     
  8. Light Guru

    Light Guru Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2011
    Messages:
    3,388
    Likes Received:
    675
    Location:
    Salt Lake City, UT
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Lens choice is based what you shoot. You have NOT told us this. What is it that you want to shoot that your current equipment cannot do?
     
  9. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2011
    Messages:
    5,612
    Likes Received:
    1,503
    Location:
    Cork Ireland
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I'm not really saying there's no difference between crop and fullframe, but these threads can irk a little when someone who obviously has a new crop camera, due the d5600 being a recent model, gets advised to buy a fullframe camera when they inquired about lenses
     
  10. dunfly

    dunfly No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2016
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    47
    All we need now is for someone to jump in and tell him to sell all his gear and go mirrorless.
     
    • Like Like x 1
    • Agree Agree x 1
  11. Designer

    Designer Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2012
    Messages:
    16,704
    Likes Received:
    4,204
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I would have traded/sold my D5600 body for a D7100. Because I wanted a more capable body with all the attributes over and above the D5xxx line. One main reason is so I could use older screw-drive lenses.

    I would not have purchased a Sigma (anything).

    I would not have purchased a 35mm 1.8 because I simply don't need it.

    I would have selected the AF-S 50mm f/1.8 over the 1.4 because of slightly better optics, and less money.

    I purchased the 70-300mm 4.5-5.6 G VR zoom for its fast focusing and to have a carry-around long zoom.

    Also I have purchased a new 58, a new 100, and used 85, 105, 135, 180, 200, and a 24-85 short zoom.

    Not to mention my tripods, speedlights, studio strobe, light stands, modifiers, backdrop, storage and carry containers, etc.
     
  12. Rafterman

    Rafterman No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2013
    Messages:
    334
    Likes Received:
    70
    Location:
    Holly Springs, NC


    If you're not sure you want to stay with Nikon, then I'd hold off on buying ANY new lens right now. As it is, you have a LOT invested in Nikon gear. You'll lose a lot of money if you try to sell off everything you have in order to switch to a different brand/system.

    I have the 85mm f/1.8G and it's a fantastic lens, even on a DX camera. At a 127mm FX equivalent and 1.8 max aperture, it's an awesome portrait and indoor sports lens. A few years ago, I was the 2nd shooter for a large indoor wedding (200 guests) and that 85 got me some great shots in a VERY dimly lit ballroom. The bride and groom were very pleased with the pictures I took. You can't go wrong with that lens.
     
    • Agree Agree x 1

Share This Page