Wow, Divorced After 30 years, bye Adobe

Ysarex

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Just finished removing Adobe Creative Cloud and all apps from my computer. I have had Photoshop on my computer for 30 years. I started teaching it in 1992. I've rarely had to pay for it as my employer picked up that tab. The CC account and apps I just deleted were payed for by the college where I teach/taught.

But that's the rub. I stopped teaching because of the pandemic. Last Spring we went to on-line which I dislike and so in Fall I chose to not teach at all. This Spring semester I again decided to not teach so that's a full year away. The college was still paying for my Adobe account and I imagine they'd keep me on the roster but I've made the decision to stay fully retired.

I personally moved away from LR and PS years ago and prefer to do as much of my editing using C1 as I can. But I always kept LR and PS installed because I needed them in the classroom. Well this morning I decided it's final and time to close the door behind me.

Wow, desktop just doesn't look the same without those LR, PS icons. Going to take some getting used to.
 
That is a huge step!

Since you're already using something else for your editing, sounds like you won't personally miss those tools. The finality of removing them is perhaps giving you pause as it relates to accepting retirement - what your new needs are and, more importantly, are not.

Enjoy the journey! :)
 
That is a huge step!

Since you're already using something else for your editing, sounds like you won't personally miss those tools. The finality of removing them is perhaps giving you pause as it relates to accepting retirement - what your new needs are and, more importantly, are not.

Enjoy the journey! :)
Yep, it's more symbolic and psychological than anything else. I retired from full-time work in 2009, but went right back to work teaching part-time and in some cases nearly as much as before I retired. In the last 1/2 dozen years I settled down to just two classes a year, one each semester at just one institution.

But I was still involved. Had the parking tag hanging from the car rear-view mirror, had an assigned office on campus, and of course a college Adobe account. My laptop was configured as a teaching tool so when I went to the classroom I just plugged it into the classroom projector. When people asked what I did I answered I'm an art teacher -- identity defining.

Now over the course of the pandemic year one symbol after another comes down. My wife took the parking tag off the rearview mirror and stuck it in the bottom of the glove compartment. And yesterday I started removing what I considered my teaching software from my computers. Starting a new chapter.

Another factor, hopefully when this nightmare ends, is going to be job scarcity. Assuming I could go back into the classroom I think I have a moral obligation now to stand aside. If that job is going to exist it needs to be filled by someone who needs the income. Thankfully my retirement is secure and I don't need the job. I think under the circumstances that requires me to not take the job.
 
You know that now you are retired...
People will assume that you have loads of time on you ha sd and you can do .......
 
Another factor, hopefully when this nightmare ends, is going to be job scarcity. Assuming I could go back into the classroom I think I have a moral obligation now to stand aside. If that job is going to exist it needs to be filled by someone who needs the income. Thankfully my retirement is secure and I don't need the job. I think under the circumstances that requires me to not take the job.
I can certainly appreciate that. It's good of you to recognize that and not keep an actual job as a kind of extended hobby.

And as Ok says above: you may find yourself on call for other things now! Could be fun! Or icky.
 
Yep, it's more symbolic and psychological than anything else. I retired from full-time work in 2009, but went right back to work teaching part-time and in some cases nearly as much as before I retired. In the last 1/2 dozen years I settled down to just two classes a year, one each semester at just one institution.

But I was still involved. Had the parking tag hanging from the car rear-view mirror, had an assigned office on campus, and of course a college Adobe account. My laptop was configured as a teaching tool so when I went to the classroom I just plugged it into the classroom projector. When people asked what I did I answered I'm an art teacher -- identity defining.

Now over the course of the pandemic year one symbol after another comes down. My wife took the parking tag off the rearview mirror and stuck it in the bottom of the glove compartment. And yesterday I started removing what I considered my teaching software from my computers. Starting a new chapter.

Another factor, hopefully when this nightmare ends, is going to be job scarcity. Assuming I could go back into the classroom I think I have a moral obligation now to stand aside. If that job is going to exist it needs to be filled by someone who needs the income. Thankfully my retirement is secure and I don't need the job. I think under the circumstances that requires me to not take the job.

And yet, while you may not NEED the job, you may consider becoming a mentor - A lifetime of experience can the the lifeline that someone needs to be able to do the job without accumulating all the scar tissue that usually comes with that experience.
 

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