Yongnuo 565ex Nikon TTL

cjdesu6

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Hi to anyone who owns or have tried the Yongnuo 565ex for Nikon, when in ETTL mode can you adjust the flash output level
Thank you.
 

tirediron

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Not having used that particular speedlight, I can't say for sure, but I wouldn't expect that I would be able to control flash output level while in E-TTL. If you find that it's not giving you the desired result, then try using your flash exposure compensation.
 

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Hi to anyone who owns or have tried the Yongnuo 565ex for Nikon, when in ETTL mode can you adjust the flash output level
Thank you.
As someone who actually DOES own and use TWO of them (albeit the Canon version), alongside TWO genuine Canon 580EXII flashes, the answer is YES, you CAN adjust the flash output level while in ETTL mode, in 1/3 stops, actually.
 

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A minor detail but FWIW, ETTL is Canon. Nikon is ITTL.

Does Yongnuo call the 1/3 stop adjustments a FEC adjustment? (FEC = Flash Exposure Control)
 
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cjdesu6

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Hi to anyone who owns or have tried the Yongnuo 565ex for Nikon, when in ETTL mode can you adjust the flash output level
Thank you.
As someone who actually DOES own and use TWO of them (albeit the Canon version), alongside TWO genuine Canon 580EXII flashes, the answer is YES, you CAN adjust the flash output level while in ETTL mode, in 1/3 stops, actually.

Thanks think I will get the 565ex instead of waiting for the Yn-500 to come out for Nikon.
 

MOREGONE

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Not to sound snarky, but could it really be iTTL/eTTL if you couldn't control the flash output? I mean, that's kinda what its about?
 

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Hi to anyone who owns or have tried the Yongnuo 565ex for Nikon, when in ETTL mode can you adjust the flash output level
Thank you.
As someone who actually DOES own and use TWO of them (albeit the Canon version), alongside TWO genuine Canon 580EXII flashes, the answer is YES, you CAN adjust the flash output level while in ETTL mode, in 1/3 stops, actually.

Just out of curiosity, how do the Yongnuo's compare to 580EXII's?
 

Buckster

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Hi to anyone who owns or have tried the Yongnuo 565ex for Nikon, when in ETTL mode can you adjust the flash output level
Thank you.
As someone who actually DOES own and use TWO of them (albeit the Canon version), alongside TWO genuine Canon 580EXII flashes, the answer is YES, you CAN adjust the flash output level while in ETTL mode, in 1/3 stops, actually.

Just out of curiosity, how do the Yongnuo's compare to 580EXII's?
VERY similar, especially in terms of light output. Physically, they're close enough to the same size, weight, quality feel and features that it just doesn't make any practical difference.

Notable differences for me have been:

  • The locking mechanism that holds the flash to the shoe. The Canon is a really nice, rock-solid mechanism that acts like a locking switch. Press the button in and flip it to the right, it locks down onto the shoe nice and tight. Push it again and flip it to the left, it unlocks and frees it from the shoe. The YN uses a threaded wheel that you spin to tighten down onto the hot shoe, then spin the other way to loosen again. They both work fine, but the Canon is easier and faster to lock and unlock, and just feels more solid.
  • High Speed Sync. I don't use it, so I don't miss it. Nonetheless, it must be said that while the Canon has it, the YN565EX doesn't. If it's an important feature for someone, that could be a deal-breaker. That said, YN does make another model that includes it, and it's still far less expensive than the Canon.
  • The controls. The Canon uses a dial with a push button in the middle of it, much like the dial on the back of their DSLR bodies, but smaller. The YN uses very simple and straightforward right, left, up, down buttons, with one in the center. I've really come to like the YN controls a lot better than the Canon. The Canon just seems like a lot of work compared to the YN, all to get to the same place. Honestly, I usually need to work the Canon with two hands when dialing in my flash, whereas the YN can be done with one.
  • Obviously, price. The price difference is remarkable, as anyone who looks into these things is well aware. But is it justified? That's the real question. Looking back over nearly 2 years of using two of the YNs and more than 5 years using two of the Canons, I can't say it has been for me. I now use my Canons and YNs completely interchangeably. There's nothing the Canons get me that the YNs don't in my work. Frankly, I'm seriously considering selling off my 2 Canon 580 EX II flashes and using the money to replace them with as many as 4 YN-560 III flashes with built in triggers, and will likely even have some money left over from the deal.
That pretty much sums it up from my experience.
 

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Update: I've now bought and tested a YN-560 III, and was well satisfied with it in every way.

That being the case, I sold both Canon 580 EXII speedlites on Ebay, ordered 3 more YN-560 III flashes on Amazon, and still have more than $300 left over after purchasing all 4 YN flashes from Amazon, plus eBay, PayPal and shipping fees were all paid. And because they've got the triggers built right in that are compatible with my working-exceptionally-great-for-me YN-603 triggers, there's not even an extra cost for more triggers to fire them, no matter how many more I might want to add.

With the 2 YN-565EX ETTL flashes I still have, that takes me from 4 speedlights to work with, up to 6, which will come in handy. I'm really happy with the whole arrangement, and glad I did it.

Bye bye overpriced Canons.
 

Buckster

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Update: The 3 additional YN-560 III flashes arrived yesterday, and all work perfectly. So now I have 6 YN flashes, and not a single problem with any of them, just as I expected.

I'm REALLY liking this built in trigger too! VERY straightforward and convenient, plus 1 less device and its batteries per flash to deal with. I'll test the range later this evening.
 

Buckster

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Well, I went out to test the range of all 6 of my Yongnuo flashes and triggers yesterday afternoon, but misjudged in my mind just how far 300 meters is. I figured I could do it right out on the road next to my place that runs down to the river locks, but again, misjudged it.

I got as far as 120 yards per my laser rangefinder, which is about 110 meters, and they were still all firing just fine. Then a curve in the road kept me from being able to see the flashes to see if they were still firing. Next time, I'll get out on the main road, which is nice and straight for miles, and do a proper test.

For now, I'm happy with the fact that they fired flawlessly and without a single failure all the way out to 120 yards, which is about the length of a US football field, including the end zones. According to the manufacturer, the range is 300 meters, so I'm eager to see how they stack up to that claim, not that I'll probably ever use them even as far as what they achieved so far.
 

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