An experiment in HDR

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by robertwsimpson, Feb 12, 2010.

  1. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I don't know if this fits the mainstream definition of HDR, but I took 3 different exposures, layered them in photoshop and then masked them off myself to come up with an "HDR" photo that I liked. Is it still HDR if you don't use photomatix? lol.

    C&C welcome

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Yes, that is HDR... nicely done, thanks for not going over board.

    Oh, and say hi to the sun. I haven't seen her in two months.
     
  3. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    how would I have gone overboard?
     
  4. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    By having ever surface with a "correct exposure" so instead of having shadows you would have had bright lines as if correctly lit. Thus creating a "cartoon" effect that is often seen with many HDR shots when people start.
    Instead you have balanced things more naturally so that you do retain the shadowed areas.

    I like the shot as well - though I would have prefered that the building in the windows be more blurred in the taking of the shot just so that the car could be the main and sole focus of ones attention.
     
  5. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I did every surface with a correct exposure.

    1 exposure for the car, 1 exposure for the floor and 1 exposure for the stuff outside of the window. Then I just masked them all off in photoshop. It would be hard to create a cartoon effect when you're just layering 3 correct exposures.
     
  6. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Also, I took the shot at f/8 because that is where my kit lens is the sharpest. That's why the building isn't blurred. I kind of like it as a backdrop, but I can see what you mean where it might look more intentional with the building slightly blurred.
     
  7. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    ahh but in an overdone HRD you would also have exposures for the shadow of the bush and the slats holding the glass in place - in addition to any shadowing present on the car itself. HDR does not have to be just 3 images alone and sometimes can be 4, 5 or even more if the scene requires such - though 3 is the normal that most people use
     
  8. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Well masking those layers would have taken tons more work on my part. I was happy just masking off the car, floor, and windows. it's way easier to just throw them into photomatix or whatever HDR software you have and let the computer do it, but I like the results of doing it by hand.
     
  9. Good Lord, learn to take a compliment.

    Googled HDR images, found this... which is an extremely popular look, and which I consider waaaay OVERBOARD.
     
  10. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I know how to take a compliment... I'm just wondering what you were talking about because you didn't really elaborate.

    I don't know how you can make a photo look like that without using actual HDR software, which I did not. What I did is the same as taking 3 photos, printing them, and then cutting out the sky from 1 photo, the car from another photo, and the ground from a third photo, and then pasting them together to form an evenly exposed photo. Am I not explaining myself clearly enough?
     
  11. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    The only problem with Photomatix is that it always leaves a halo around the subject. When the image is larger (screen filling) the halo isn't as noticeable as when it's much smaller, say 800x533.

    I've not found a way to reliably avoid the halo in Photomatix. But then I've not spent much time trying to figure it out as HDR really isn't my thing.

    The masking approach you've taken will easily avoid the issue of halos.
     
  12. robertwsimpson

    robertwsimpson No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Actually, I don't have much of a halo problem in photomatix. If you want, I can show you some settings for the sliders that might help. I find that it has a LOT to do with the photo itself and the difference in lighting between different parts of the photo. Like if you're using data from the minimum exposure right next to data from the maximum exposure, Halos are far more likely. It's actually very difficult to get rid of the halos when masking yourself. That's why I didn't worry much about masking smaller portions of the photo (like the dividers in the windows for example).

    Thanks everyone for stopping by! I enjoy trying new things in photography and seeing if they're working.
     

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