Another question about lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ryan7783, Apr 25, 2008.

  1. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Oh no not another one of these!

    I have been commissioned by a friend to shoot some pictures for his new business. He just started his own screen printing business and is actually doing quite well already. Anyway he asked me if I would shoot a few pictures of him and a model wearing his t-shirts and of course I jumped on the chance to gain some experience. The pictures will be used on his website which, I imagine, will be getting a lot of traffic since his sales are already through the roof.

    That being said, I'd like to know what kind of lighting I might need for such a thing. He understands that I do not already own lighting equipment and that for me to go out and buy any would be a kick in the wallet so he has agreed to use "shop lights" and cover them with tracing paper as sort of a makeshift diffuser. Are they're any objections to why this might not be a good idea? He says he wants sharp images with good color.

    I guess what I'm asking in a roundabout way is - Will someone please tell me what I can inexpensively do to make his products and models look fairly decent? I know this is a broad questions and I also know that you get what you pay for but if anyone can offer some "lighting tricks" I would be greatly appreciative. Thanks

    oh I should also mention that the pictures will be shot outside in front of his porch and in his bedroom
     
  2. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2007
    Messages:
    6,111
    Likes Received:
    15
    Location:
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  3. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    2,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    hehe

    yes, strobist is amazing.

    But some other advice would be to go pick up some sheets to use a backdrops. The shop lights will probably not be that big of a problem, it just might take some time to dial in the exposure. How many lights do you have to work with?
     
  4. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I have been reading a little there but I was mainly asking the pro's and semi-pro's here if they had any inexpensive tricks to lighting to give the pictures that "dirty" or "industrial" look. I will continue reading strobist but for now, can anyone suggest anything?


    I have a few and he has a few so maybe 6 total. I'm fairly certain he wants the background included in the pictures...even though the main emphasis will be on the shirt itself. I had mentioned I would consider using a 4.5 DOF for a blurry background and he seemed to agree with that.
     
  5. JimmyO

    JimmyO TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2008
    Messages:
    2,132
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NJ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Why not use your 50mm f/1.8?
     
  6. Tiberius47

    Tiberius47 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    46
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Read the manual flash tutorial in my signature and make sure you have a flash and a way to trigger it from off camera.

    A nice setup with natural light and a single flash is to have the flash directly opposite the natural light. Soften the natural light first. Then, place the flash so it is in the subject's shadow. So, if the natural light source is behind and to the left of the subject, the flash will be in front and to the right. This creates a crisp look once you get the light balanced.
     
  7. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit


    that was part of the plan too.


    Thanks for the advice. I'll do that
     
  8. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Ok I have another question...

    I've decided I want the SB800, which I've seen for $309.99, but occasionally I see a deal for the flash, battery tube cases, batteries, off camera extension shoe cord and flash flip camera bracket for $409.99

    I'm not too familiar with lighting prices so is that a good deal? Should I bother spending the extra hundred bucks for the other stuff or is it just a waste of money?

    oh yeah here's the link
    http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-SB-800-...3?ie=UTF8&s=electronics&qid=1209325461&sr=8-3
     
  9. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    anyone?
     
  10. Tiberius47

    Tiberius47 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2007
    Messages:
    742
    Likes Received:
    46
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    For off camera flash, all you really need to get started is a flash (obviously) a way to fire it from off camera (sync cords work fine and aren't that expensive) and a stand to put the flash on (a cheap wobbly tripod will do fine).

    You can pick up a second hand flash at a reasonable price (it doesn't even have to be compatible with your camera, all it needs is a sync port to take the cord), just make sure it has manual adjustments.

    The flash bracket is just a way of getting the flash slightly further away from the lens axis. I personally wouldn't go and get one, as it won't give you any significant advantage over on camera flash, as it is still basically on camera flash. You can get the same results by holding the flash in your left hand just above the camera. And that will give you more flexibility as well. The off camera shoe cords that keep all the metering information intact are nice but they are rather expensive, and in my experience they are meant simply to mount the flash on a bracket, so they aren't that long.
     
  11. ryan7783

    ryan7783 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    346
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Richmond, VA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    thanks very much. So you're saying I need a flash with manual adjustments, a tripod, and a cord?
     
  12. pyropenguin

    pyropenguin TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2006
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Check out the 'Starving Student Kit' on here. I haven't used it but I've heard good things about it. Good luck :)
     

Share This Page