Canon 35mm SLR for a newbie :(

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by mulletman13, Jul 22, 2005.

  1. mulletman13

    mulletman13 TPF Noob!

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    Hey all,

    I've used the search function in this forum, but can't seem to find something that has the same features as I would like, so I posted a topic.

    Anywho, I'm currently in the market for a beginner SLR, one with fully adjustable exposure/f-stop/shutter speed, and preferrably a Canon. I have been checking out the Canon Rebel GII camera, seems like a good buy. Also I've been interested in the Canon Ti camera, but it seems to be nearly the same as the GII... which has better features for me? Will they both have the same manual controls? I dont really care about the autofocus, I am mainly in this for manual operation. There is also the K-series and everything, but I'm not completely sure as I haven't researched the entire line.

    Any advice would be greatly appreciated. :)

    Thanks in advance!
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Hi there, and welcome!

    Why go for modern electronics when traditional manual will probably do the job much more cheaply? Canon, Nikon, Pentax and Olympus are but four of a plethora of great brands who feature sturdy manual bodies with some of the world's best lenses.

    If you're a beginner, there's no substitute for old school technology. You don't need 64 point matrix auto-focus with object tracking and eyeball control. You need a reliable body and a sharp bright lens to accompany your sharp bright brain! :)

    Here's some examples of great cameras from the above manufacturers:

    Nikon:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=30035&item=7530681227&rd=1

    Canon:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=30033&item=7532072281&rd=1

    Pentax:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=15240&item=7531355551&rd=1

    Olympus:
    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=15239&item=7532110203&rd=1

    I'd say don't bother buying an overly complicated electronic camera as they don't have much of a resale value, compared to these "classics" and won't help you get a better picture in the end. The toys are for convenience later, the fundamentals are there on all of these cameras and any good photographer could produce world-class results with them!

    Good luck.

    Rob
     
  3. fadingaway1986

    fadingaway1986 I Burn Easily :(

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    I would suggest getting a fully manual camera if thats what you want to do... it's too easy to cheat otherwise!

    Umm. Did I read the price of that canon wrong?
     
  4. mulletman13

    mulletman13 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the replies and that is a really good idea-- I'm only hesitent to buy some of those 'older' CPU driven cameras, as they seem like they would be ready to break anytime now .... I could be completely wrong about this however :)

    Also, I have an older camera (I believe an Olympus from 1982) which uses an LCD display to calibrate various options, however it cannot manually do anything really, and it is in bad shape due to it's age.

    Another thing thats entered my head is the idea of lenses -- the newer Canon Rebels use lenses which are compatible (and going to be compatible) with current Canon digital SLRs, which is kindof nice as you don't have to buy new lenses and everything when you upgrade. Plus the newer cameras are just that -- new and reliable.

    Even so I'm looking into these older manual cameras because you're both right -- I would just love to learn on this camera and take as many practice shots as possible before I upgrade...

    Thanks again,

    Ken
     
  5. fadingaway1986

    fadingaway1986 I Burn Easily :(

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    If you do plan to upgrade, go with a Canon Rebel. I have one, and it's great. I took my lenses with me to a 300D.


    Should be able to get them cheap off ebay, or reasonably cheap in a shop. If possible, don't get a kit. Get a body only, and then buy a good lens (everyone on here seems to like a F/1.8 50mm prime lens, I don't have one personally) the kit lens is fine for everyday use. but I really notice the loss of quality on my digitals. And I wish I had the money for a prime.
     
  6. mulletman13

    mulletman13 TPF Noob!

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    Hehe , not to be rude or anything, but I did post that I would like to go with a Rebel, just not sure which line of 35mm... it's hard to find good comparative information, as they all seem to be the same ( i mean the Rebel GII, Ti, K2, etc.).

    Thanks!
     
  7. fadingaway1986

    fadingaway1986 I Burn Easily :(

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    Mine is a 3000N. Has all the features I need.

    I am not sure of the difference between them all.

    But the way I chose, we sold it where I worked, so I knew where to get it (and didnt know anything about any other models then)

    SO maybe check out some stores and see whats to offer in your area.
     
  8. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    You're a smart guy. You want one system and you don't want to buy twice.

    A rebel will do. I don't know the details about them and I'll never touch one with a 10 foot pole. They are plastic toys. Their shutters are also not very reliable as compared to the other cameras. Just make sure it has a metering mode other than matrix (partial or center weighted).

    I'd buy a recent Elan if I were going the Canon AF way. Metal and more functions and more controls. Hard to outgrow.

    Or go for an EOS 600 series. Those cameras give you all you need for a photo class. You can pick one up for under a 100 bucks with a 50mm lens sometimes.

    What else do you need to know? You're wrong about older cameras being less reliable. Because they're fully mechanical, there's less parts and minimal electronics. They're build with metal. Compare that to an autofocus plastic wonders, which are not built to last, tons of electronics and have to flip the mirror at 3 fps... this all adds parts which make the modern cameras break a lot more often.

    Viewfinders on AF cameras are way worse than on manuals too. You won't be able to focus reliably by hand, which is very important.

    One lens for the AF camera will cost as the whole MF outfit.

    Also, you don't know what you like to shoot now. You don't know what focal lengths you're gonna use. With mf you get primes and learn them intimately. With AF it's mostly about speed, zooms, convenience and experience.

    Most of the experienced photogs would try to push you in the manual focus world right now. You learn faster there, for many reasons... and you get a complete MF outfit for 200-300 bucks... the cost of one decent filter. ;)

    Do yourself a favour and get one of those manual focus cams robhesketh mentioned above. You won't lose

    Welcome to the forum
     
  9. wharrison

    wharrison TPF Noob!

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    Mulletman13:

    Personally, I'd opt for the Canon A-1 - in near mint condition with a high serial number - and a Canon FD 50mm F/1.4 lens. After its arrival, call Canon and request a listing of Canon authorized repair facilities and send in the body to one of them to give the camera a good CLA (Cleaning, Lubrication, and Adjustments - if you didn't know). It may cost a bit, but then you will have a very nice camera for many years to come and in the process you will gain better knowledge and/or experience in the basics of film photography.

    In the meantime, you might wish to explore the web sites below for additional information and/or bookmark them for future reference.

    The first is an excellent reference site for Canon FD lenses and cameras.

    http://www.mir.com.my/rb/photography/companies/canon/fdresources/fdlenses/

    The second site is an excellent resource of camera, lens, etc. reviews written by the users of the equipment among other things photographic.

    http://www.photosig.com

    Once you arrive at the main page, click on the "Reviews" tab and go exploring.

    While the Canon A-1 camera and its array of Canon FD lenses would be an excellent choice, IMHO, you might wish to read both of the articles contained in the two links below before making your decision.

    http://www.imx.nl/photosite/comments/c011.html

    http://www.imx.nl/photosite/comments/c009.html

    As for me personally, I have too much invested - in terms of time, experience, preference, and money - in film camera equipment - Leica and Canon - to go exploring the Digital camera world at this time and place.

    So my best advice is to continue to do your "homework" and then make your wise and thoughtful decision.

    Best begards in your photographic explorations.

    Bill
     

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