Don't laugh at me...

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by bytch_mynickname, Mar 5, 2007.

  1. bytch_mynickname

    bytch_mynickname TPF Noob!

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    I have a rebel Xt but recently bought a reb xs film camera for school. I have been looking at film but it is so overwhelming, what do I buy? I will be learning to develop the film in a black and white darkroom. I know I need B&W film but what brand, ISO? Anything special I should know? Best place to get said film?

    Also, they said the most expensive part is buying the paper. Where does one get this paper and what specifics should I be looking for?

    Any links to buy the stuff online would be much appreciated. Thanks!
     
  2. jiconlin

    jiconlin TPF Noob!

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    Most major distributors of photo equipment offer both paper and film, and developing necessities, like tanks and chemicals.

    Good luck though. It seems like most of this stuff has gone through the roof in pricing. You would think with the implementation of digital, prices would be reduced, but it is sadly the opposite.

    Good luck learning film, it's a knowledge base that will make you a better digital photographer.
     
  3. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Just click on any of our above sponsors - the Freestyle link above left, or B&H or Adorama. I'm surprised you've been left to hang like this and make your own choices as a new film student - I received pretty detailed lists of what to get, and it really helped.

    Although there are plenty of student grade films, you might want to start with Ilford or Kodak - I would bet money you'll be asked to shoot both 400 and 100 ISO, so for Kodak look for TMax or Tri-X - widely available in both speeds, and with Ilford, it's HP5 or FP4.

    Start with student grade resin-coated paper - look for the student line on Freestyle. It's quite reasonably priced and a great way to get started.

    And I disagree with the above poster - prices on certain films may indeed seem expensive, but darkroom equipment, cameras, most all things analog are very affordable these days. So go have fun in film-world; it's an awesome place to be. ;) You'll feel very empowered once you've worked with film and made your own prints.
     
  4. bytch_mynickname

    bytch_mynickname TPF Noob!

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    Also, anyone know the cheapest place to buy IR film? Is there a special technique or materials to develop it or is the technique all in taking the picture?

    I love IR photography and have only done it on digital and I think it seems fitting to try it on film too but if I can't find anything cheaper than what I have seen, I will stick to digital for the IR.
     
  5. bytch_mynickname

    bytch_mynickname TPF Noob!

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    Technically I am not a film student so to speak. My university doesn't even have a photography class :( We did have a photography club many years ago (or so I am told) but there weren't enough members to keep it going. Well a art student decided she wanted to start a photography club again and see if there would be any interest in it now. The response has been overwhelming as far as people interested. She is now just working on getting the photo club to be recognized by the university so we can get some funding.
    There is a professor there that is going to teach us how to use the darkroom and everything but the specifics haven't been discussed yet because as of now, the darkroom has been used as storage, they just sent out an email letting everyone know that it has been cleaned out and we can begin using it as soon as the chemicals come in.

    Anyhow, it isn't a class where we will be required to shoot certain films or anything like that, just so it is within the capabilities of being developed in the darkroom. I just wanted to get a heads up as to what I should be looking for and where to get it at good prices. I am a smart shopper and have to be in control when buying something, I don't just go somewhere and buy it because they have it, I do my research and get the best bang for the buck.
     
  6. Sw1tchFX

    Sw1tchFX TPF Noob!

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    I use Tmax 100 99% of the time when i'm shooting B&W film. If it's not Tmax, it's HP5.
     
  7. bytch_mynickname

    bytch_mynickname TPF Noob!

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    Care to explain what the difference are? Sorry to be a PITA but this is all new to me.
     
  8. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    No, you're not being a PITA; we all have to learn sometime. I use Kodak's Tri-X. It's inexpensive, it's been around FOREVER (50+ years, I think), and it's very forgiving if you make mistakes. I've processed my film at different times and different temperatures and come out with acceptable results. For me, and for what I use my camera for, I usually use 400 ASA. It seems to be really versitile.

    When I started, I bought two rolls of lots of different brands from B & H and Freestyle: Agfa, Fuji, Kodak, etc, and tried each of them a bit. I just decided to pick Tri-X and stick with it.

    They say the rule of thumb is to pick a film and stick with it until you get the hang of things. Having been through hundreds or thousands of feet of Tri-X over the past few years (I'm a relative newbie, too, compared to Terri and Fred:mrgreen:) and have started to branch out into other lines. You start to notice some differences in them: Some seem a bit contrastier. Some are a bit grainier. I'm not good enough yet to use different films for different effects, but maybe someday I will be.

    As far as IR film goes, I have no answers for you on that. Terri will, though, if I'm not mistaken. My hunch is that you'll want to wait a little while before you try that--I hear it's a bit finniky.

    Hopefully that'll answer SOME of your questions. I know you'll have more. Don't be afraid. We all still ask a lot ;)
     
  9. Efergoh

    Efergoh TPF Noob!

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    Ayup. And you can shake the pi$$ out of it when you develop and it doesn't get too grainy like some other films do.

    Indeed. First of all, there is no such animal as "cheap" IR film.

    It must be opened, loaded, unloaded, and developed in total darkness. If your camera has a window that shows what film is loaded, you will want to put gaffer's tape over that window to keep light out of it. You will also need a red filter for your lens.
     
  10. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Thumbs up to your professor for jump starting the club!!!! I started a photography technology degree in between holding down a career a few years ago and found being in the darkroom such a wonderful experience. I could spend 6 hours in there and never even realize it.

    My darkroom classes were all taught with Tmax. It is easy to learn, fine grain, and chemicals are relatively easy to find. I'm no longer in the college program but 80% of the film I shoot today is still Tmax. I now submit the film to be developed in the lab but the printing is done at home. I've never been dissappointed by the film.
     
  11. bytch_mynickname

    bytch_mynickname TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the replies, I feel a little better about this film thing :lol:
     
  12. meesh

    meesh TPF Noob!

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    yay i can finally submit my own "tip" --- im taking a photo class too and ive gone to freestyle a few times to buy some things (love the store and the people are really really helpful!) As far as the paper goes- I split a huge box of 250 with someone in my class. Ive been going through a lot of paper because Im extremely picky and i want things to be perfect. i took a small stack of paper and cut them into thirds to do my tests. alsooo if you do split the paper with someone, make sure you buy an extra box and light-proof bag. it was only a dollar or so...good luck! oh yeah- i love the ilford pearl paper
     

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