Eccentricity

Discussion in 'Photographic Discussions' started by abraxas, Nov 27, 2008.

  1. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Do our eccentricities, character flaws, disorders, neurosis, psychosis, etc. effect one's creativity and the ability to express/implement it?

    Is a truly ~normal~ personality, truly uncreative?

    Would you be willing to let yourself go bat-****ing-crazy to be a famous artist/photographer? If so, what would be your "poison" of choice?

    Don't be paranoid, speak up.

    :biglaugh:
     
  2. TwoRails

    TwoRails TPF Noob!

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    Yes. I don't see how it would not.

    I say no. I don't think there really is a "normal" person in a sense. What is "normal" in your area may not be "normal" in mine, which is not "normal" in some other part of the world.

    No. I have no need for fame.
     
  3. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think it does affect our creativity. Whatever is us, which includes our flaws, disorders, our upbringing and so on definatly have a play in who we are and how we are creative. Where someone has a flaw in something, they also have a talent somewhere else.

    Does it affect our ability to express? It might, depending on what the issue is. I've met many people who have troubles expressing themselves in simple conversation, but yet can produce amazing art. And I've met the opposite.

    As said already, what is normal? If you are thinking that someone normal has a perfectly balanced right vs left side of the brain type of thing, then I think they are still creative, just in a different way. Just as someone who is extremely logical can be creative in a scientific way.

    Everyone has the ability to be creative, but we need to define creativity. Is someone who is really quick with jokes around the dinner table creative? I would think so, just maybe not in an artistic way.

    I would not. Fame is not something I strive for. If it happens fine, but its not a goal so therefore I wouldn't let myself do anything different, compromise my own values, just to be famous.

    Hell, why would I want to hang out with Tom Cruise?
     
  4. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    1 - Most definitely! eccentric people, as a general rule, tend to see things from a different perspective. That lends itself to uniqueness and therefore not something that we see as the norm. Is it creative? Likely only from the point of view of it's rarity. Is it a talent that can be channeled into creative photography? Now, thats a good question.

    2 - Yes and no. "normal" from the point of view as someone with no desire to search beyond mediocrity, as seems to be the norm in today's society, won't lend itself well to creativity. However, there are some truly creative people out there that are as normal as you and I, that mold something from nothing and build empires and legacys from. There is a fine line, though...

    3 - THIS is that line I spoke of.... where s the line between genius and insanity? Mozart for example, was eccentric as hell, yet his music is undeniable. Creativity... where does it jump off the end of the pier from genius to ludicrous? A lot comes down to perception... not just from the point of view of the "artist", but the public. Where the artist may see creativity expressed to it's fullest, another sees it as a joke.

    Would *I* want to go jump off the edge of the pier to be "savant level creative"? No. I was what some call a child prodigy in music. The signs were there from age 2, formal lessons started at age 4 and I had passed all exams for my master's degree while in my early teens and out of dozens of competitions never went lower than 1st place. As soon as I hit 16, I not only walked away from that to reclaim my "normalcy"... I ran head long into it and smiled all the way. I gratefully cede that path to someone stronger than I shall ever be.

    This is one of those rhetorical questions, isn't it abraxas?? :lol: :lol:

    bigtwinky... another montrealer. Stiff upper lip, gents... we'll take over this place soon enough! :lmao: :lmao:
     
  5. DRoberts

    DRoberts TPF Noob!

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    Without a doubt our "quirks" lead our creativity...Just look at Chiller! :lol:
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    I think it is more likely that seeing things differently is what makes people appear eccentric - not the other way around.
    Children tend to see things far differently than adults do so they could be seen as eccentric. But the Educational and Social systems we have are designed to 'homogenise' our behaviour: Society likes people to all be the same and we like to be the same as everyone else. No-one likes being different because it singles you out and sets you apart.
    If however you miss out on this process of being socially normalised then your behaviour and attitudes can be considered 'eccentric'.
    I went to an Art College where being different was seen as an advantage. We would do things or wear clothes that made us stand out from the crowd, but we didn't do it for that reason. We did get ridiculed a lot - but what we did that was outlandish became fashionable several years later and the people who had laughed at us started doing it.
    We had moved on by then.
    I would argue that to be 'normal' is to be boring ;)

    But in any discussion of this kind one needs to define exactly what is meant by 'normal' to start with.
     
  7. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    conforming with or constituting a norm or standard or level or type or social norm; not abnormal; "serve wine at normal room temperature"; "normal ...

    in accordance with scientific laws
    being approximately average or within certain limits in e.g. intelligence and development; "a perfectly normal child"; "of normal intelligence"; "the most normal person I've ever met"

    forming a right angle <-- my fav)

    convention: something regarded as a normative example; "the convention of not naming the main character"; "violence is the rule not the exception"; "his formula for impressing visitors"

    from:
    http://wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

    Relatively - Crazy compared to your social circle (NOT including the internet and pretend friends (unless they really, really are pretend).
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2008
  8. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    That's like saying 'yellow is a colour that isn't blue'.
    It's true but it's about as much use as a second arsehole.
    There is no absolute definition of 'normal' because there is no such thing as normal.
    There are things that we assume are normal but that is only because we do them so we assume that everyone does.
    Eating boiled eggs in the bath could be considered odd behaviour by some but not by a person who does it.
    I once knew someone who had been married for forty years and had never seen his wife naked. He thought that was normal and I thought it was weird.
    Which one of us was right?
    And who decides what is the norm? You? Me? A civil servant in some Government department?
    Discuss. ;)
     
  9. abraxas

    abraxas No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Pisses me off when you make me think. :)

    Normal is boring?- Isn't that "the market?"

    I think if I could choose crazy- I'd probably run with some type of paranoid-schizophrenia. There's some potential in there.
     
  10. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Just doing my job, sir. Just doing my job.

    The trouble with trying to define words like 'normal' is that there are no absolutes and they are not easily quantifiable.
    All we can do is make judgements based on our own opinions. And this takes us in to very slippery ground.
    We would all consider ourselves to be normal but if you compared us all then you would find that we all had differences and some could be extreme.
    And some of the differences can be surprising.
    We Brits think that Yanks are odd in many respects - spelling night 'n-i-t-e' is only a minor one.
    I'm sure Americans think the British strange.
    This makes it clear that even if you can come to a consensus on what is 'normal' it only holds true in your own small cultural sphere and at this point in time.
    The definition of necessity would have to constantly change.
    And this is exactly what happens.

    And now to thoroughly rain on your parade...
    What is the link between eccentricity and creativity?
    There are many creative people who are not eccentric.
    There are very many eccentric people who are not creative.
    Murderers, for example, could be described as eccentric because their behaviour is certainly not normal (not these days, at any rate). Does this mean that murderers are just being creative in an original and novel way*?
    If not, why not?
    Discuss. :mrgreen:


    * You might like to read On Murder, Considered As One Of The Fine Arts by Thomas de Quincey before answering.
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2008
  11. DRoberts

    DRoberts TPF Noob!

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    True as that statement may be, there still has to be a measure to which the term normal in human behavior can be weighed. To me this is best described in the legal acceptance of the word.

    Normal - The response to a given situation by a reasonable person.

    Example...100 people are asked to jump off a 20 story building. 99 of these people refuse, while 1 jumps. Therefore it is assumed that declining to jump off the building is a normal (reasonable) response, and the 1 person who did jump made an abnormal (unreasonable) response.
     
  12. TwoRails

    TwoRails TPF Noob!

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    And that brings us full circle as it depends on where you are for that to apply. In certain little areas, it's "hey, lets go pirate a ship!" and everybody chimes in. That's their normal. Or, "hey, let's go blow something up" and they do, that's their normal. Less drastic but still the same, "hey, let's all get ripped on drugs" and everybody does... and so on. So it still comes down to 'normal' is what people do in their specific crowd and environment.
     

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